Future of orcas takes center stage at Salish Sea conference – PSI

It was worth spending even a day at the Salish Sea Conference. If you get a chance to go, you should.

Gov. Jay Inslee joined former Interior Secretary Sally Jewell to open three days of science talks at the Salish Sea Ecosystem Conference in Seattle. The conference includes about 700 scientific presentations on topics ranging from orcas to habitat restoration, from climate change to toxic chemicals.

https://www.eopugetsound.org/magazine/ssec2018/opening

Dr. Lucas Hart named Director of the Northwest Straits

This is incredibly good news. Choosing a successor to Rich Childers is not an easy task. We wish Rich all the best on his next step. He’s been a great leader for the Commission.

I’ve know Lucas since the last decade, when he volunteered to go down to Lobby Day sponsored by the late, great People for Puget Sound.

Lucas rode shotgun in my van as I took a load of folks down from Port Townsend. We talked the whole way down and back, and I got to know him. When we parted I was left thinking, “this is someone who I will be hearing about in the future.”

He joined us on the Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee, so I got to see him working with us on the programs we worked on, and then he got hired onto the Commission as Program Manager. His calm demeanor and solid work showed his ability to lead.

It is so hard to find leadership in roles such as this. It is critically important to find someone with a knowledge of place, a solid base of local contacts, hopefully someone who is being promoted from within for great work, leadership and helping an organization succeed. I’m truly thrilled that the NW Straits Commission took the step to recognize Lucas and promote him to this role. Congratulations, Lucas. We all look forward to working with you in the future.

The Northwest Straits Marine Conservation Commission is pleased to announce that Dr. Lucas Hart will be its next Director.  Dr. Hart has been with the Commission the past three years serving as the Marine Program Manager and brings a wealth of skills and experience to the role of Director. He is not only a skilled marine scientist and outstanding communicator, but has served in various volunteer positions with several Puget Sound conservation organizations and worked with these groups to advocate for their objectives before elected and appointed officials. Commission Chair Nan McKay said, “Members of the Commission look forward to Lucas’s leadership and to working with him to advance the goals of the Northwest Straits Initiative.” Please join us in welcoming Lucas as the new Director.  He will be starting this position officially on April 20, 2018.

EVENT: Sierra Club Wastewater National Call In

Join Sierra Club’s Wastewater Residuals (formerly  Sewage Sludge)

Grassroots Team’s National Call

VICTORS Against Sewage Sludging

WEDNESDAY   APRIL 18   5 PM/PT   8 PM/ET

Call:    1-866 501 6174      Code: 1892005#

How did a small Eastern Washington State community of organic farmers defeat the application of sewage sludge in their farm land watershed?

 

Hear Mill Canyon resident Morton Alexander describe the Tolstoy Farm community and its fight against getting sludged.

Hear Attorney Rachael Osborn explain the legal issues involved.

 

morton alexander

Morton Alexander is a retired WA State employee and experienced community organizer.  He has lived in Mill Canyon for 46 years.  He is a neighbor to the Tolstoy Farm and maintains his own organic orchard.  His natural spring has been a source of clean drinking water for neighbors.    (Read more at   www.protectmillcanyonwatershed.org )   Photo credit: Colin Mulvany

 

Rachel Osborne

Rachael Paschal Osborn is a retired public interest water lawyer who lives on WA State’s Vashon Island.  She assisted the Mill Canyon farmers and orchardists in preventing the sludge permit.

 

Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe aims to re-establish oyster farm in Dungeness refuge – PDN

The Jamestown S’Klallam look to expand operations beyond the oyster beds currently being farmed in Sequim Bay. While this project is being opposed by two of the environmental organizations on the Peninsula, it is not being opposed by the Clallam Marine Resources Committee, which has representation of the Tribes on it, and they are actually working collaboratively with the Jamestown staff to find the existing eel grass beds and work around them. The tribe has been doing a lot of aquaculture  in Sequim Bay over the last 10 years, with an oyster farm and other activity. This has been positive, in that beyond just the job opportunities for the Tribe, it has made the Tribe extremely sensitive to cleaning up any pollution that might enter the Bay near Blyn. Their ongoing efforts to restore  chum salmon to JimmyComeLately Creek have been very successful.  The Tribe also regularly fishes and crabs at Cline Spit, the boat launch site for smaller boats in that bay on the east side of the Spit. It is unclear of whether an EIS, Hydraulic Permit Application (HPA) or other permits beyond standard State permits is needed. More on that in a later post.

SEQUIM — The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe seeks to re-establish an oyster farm in Dungeness Bay and will have its proposal heard by the Clallam County Hearing Examiner on Thursday.

The tribe’s oyster farm would be on 50 acres of leased Department of Natural Resources tideland within the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, said Ron Allen, tribal chairman. The farm would be in the bay about 4,000 feet north of Cline Spit.

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/jamestown-sklallam-tribe-aims-to-re-establish-oyster-farm-in-dungeness-refuge/

Nurse to run against Chapman – PDN

So a self described supporter of Donald Trump (“he has grown on me”), pro NRA, against helping house low income people in our community, against supporting more money for education, against environmental protections, and against lowering property taxes (which was done by the Democrats after the Republicans, when in power, raised them radically which was one good reason that the low income  housing initiative failed), is going to challenge Mike Chapman. Should be an interesting race.

I don’t think that the Democrats should underestimate this woman’s ability to run against Rep. Chapman. Clallam county is a mixed bag when it comes to voting and could very likely go for Ms. Wilke. Her politics won’t play in Port Townsend, but might in the central and south county.

Port Townsend Republican Jodi Wilke said Monday she opposes the one-term Democratic incumbent’s yes vote on using the rainy-day surplus to pay for education and for property tax relief.

Wilke, 58, also is against additional gun regulations on assault-style rifles and bump stocks, a rifle-firepower accessory, and says the state Department of Natural Resources has overstepped its authority on rules setting aside marbled murrelet habitat, claiming the state Legislature should have more say in setting policy.

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/politics/nurse-to-challenge-chapman-for-district-state-rep-seat/

Underwater noise pollution also disturbs fish, study suggests – CBC

More evidence that noise pollution in the waters of the Salish Sea can have negative impacts on more than just Orcas.

Plastics and oil aren’t the only types of pollution having a negative impact on fish. According to a new study entitled Sound the Alarm, noise is also a growing problem for the aquatic animals. “In terms of fish behaviour and physiology, it’s negative responses across the board,” said Kieran Cox, a doctoral student at the University of Victoria. Cox and fish ecologist, Francis Juanes, led the collaborative team that conducted the research, which was published in the peer-reviewed journal Global Change Biology. (CBC)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/underwater-noise-pollution-also-disturbs-fish-study-suggests-1.4600024

A Fight Over Salmon-Killing Roads Is Now A Supreme Court Case About Native Rights – KUOW

Well, it’s coming down to a Supreme Court showdown over how fast we have to replace the culverts, which have been proven to be keeping returning salmon from getting to spawning streams. This is part of 100 years or more of destruction of salmon habitat and the Tribes are pretty hard core about us getting this done sooner than later, given returning salmon numbers.

Seventeen years ago, 21 tribes sued the state of Washington to fix those culverts. On April 18, the U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to take on the case. The question is whether or not state taxpayers should have to dish out billions to dig up roads so salmon can get through. And the court’s decision will have repercussions for tribes all over the West and Midwest. Eilis O’Neill reports. (KUOW)

http://kuow.org/post/fight-over-salmon-killing-roads-now-supreme-court-case-about-native-rights

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