Sudden Oak Disease Arrives in Washington State – KUOW

Very disturbing news given that the disease can attack rhododendrons, Douglas firs, and western larches. 

A Disease That’s Felled Forests in California and Oregon Shows up in Washington http://www.opb.org/news/article/a-disease-thats-felled-forests-in-california-and-oregon-shows-up-in-washington/

It’s a sunny spring morning at the Bloedel Reserve, a public garden on Puget Sound’s Bainbridge Island. Roads lead to paths lined with blossoming bushes and trees. Darren Strenge, the reserve’s plant health manager, is showing me the rhododendron glen. That’s where a gardener first spotted a problem back in 2015: a plant that wasn’t healthy…. Strenge took a sample and sent it into a lab. The answer came back: the plant had the pathogen that causes sudden oak death. The disease has decimated forests in California and infected forests in southwestern Oregon. And now it’s made a return to Western Washington, where rhododendrons, Douglas firs, and western larches are most susceptible. It has the potential for such disastrous effects that agencies, scientists, and citizens are working together to try to keep it under control. Eilís O’Neill reports. (KUOW/EarthFix)

EVENT: Digging for Dinner! Saturday!

This is always a fun day. Never dug for clams? A chance to learn with a pro. Bring the kids! My son always loved digging clams. Still does.

Diggin' for Dinner 2017v_6POSTER

More on the Green Crab invasion

April 26, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact:

MaryAnn Wagner, Washington Sea Grant, 206-616-6353, maryannb@uw.edu

Allen Pleus, Aquatic Invasive Species Unit Lead, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife, 360-902-2724, allen.pleus@dfw.wa.gov

Lorenz Sollmann, Deputy Project Leader, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, 360-457-8451, Lorenz_Sollmann@fws.gov

Invasive Green Crab Found at Dungeness Spit

Sequim, WA — A new population of invasive European green crab has been found at Dungeness Spit, near Sequim, Washington, rekindling concern over the potential for damage to local marine life and shorelines.

Staff and volunteers from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), which manages Dungeness Spit National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), captured a total of 13 European green crab over the past two weeks as part of Washington Sea Grant’s (WSG) Crab Team early detection program. These numbers indicate that the invasive crabs are more abundant at Dungeness Spit than at the two other known locations in Washington’s inland waters.

“Directly addressing the threat of green crab requires both early detection and rapid response, with the goal of finding isolated populations when they are still rare and reducing or eliminating them,” said Allen Pleus, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Aquatic Invasive Species Unit Lead.

The first discovery of this globally damaging invasive crab in Washington’s Salish Sea was made by WSG Crab Team volunteers last August on San Juan Island, followed quickly by a detection at the Padilla Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve (PBNERR), near Mt. Vernon. In both cases, follow-up rapid response trapping and removal by a joint WSG, WDFW, and PBNERR team showed that the crabs were present, but still very rare in those locations.

“This is a very different situation,” says Crab Team Program Coordinator, Emily Grason. “In Padilla Bay, the crabs we found were too far apart to find and mate with each other, but at Dungeness Spit, multiple crabs are being found at the same site, over successive days of trapping. This indicates a situation where the population could grow very quickly, if we don’t intervene.”

Dungeness Spit NWR, in coordination with WDFW and the WSG Crab Team staff, immediately responded to the initial detection with a rapid response trapping effort and are currently working on a plan with local stakeholders for ongoing response and removal efforts for the area.

European green crab is one of the most globally-successful invasive species, and established populations are problems in Australia, South Africa, and the East Coast of the U.S. In places where the crab has become abundant, it has been blamed for damaging shellfish harvests and decimating sea grass beds. Research on the U.S. West Coast has indicated that native organisms such as shore crabs, young Dungeness crabs, as well as shellfish, could be harmed by invasive green crab. The nearest known population of green crab to Washington state is just across the Strait of Juan de Fuca, west of Victoria, British Columbia, in Sooke Inlet.

The sites at Dungeness Spit are part of WSG Crab Team’s rapidly expanding early detection network, which currently numbers 36 sites, maintained by volunteers, tribes and agencies.

Concerned citizens can help by keeping a lookout for European green crab when visiting salt marshes and pocket estuaries. For information on how to recognize the crab, and likely places to look, visit the Crab Team website: wsg.washington.edu/crabteam. Anyone who thinks they have found a green crab should leave the crab in place and email photographs to the WSG Crab Team at crabteam@uw.edu.

Washington Sea Grant, based at the University of Washington, provides statewide research, outreach and education services addressing the challenges facing our ocean and coasts. The National Sea Grant College Program is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. http://www.wsg.washington.edu.

Join the conversation: WASeaGrant and Facebook.com/WaSeaGrant. Crab Team Facebook.com and Crab Team Twitter

Photos available. Captions below:

1-European Green Crab found at Dungeness Spit, Sequim, April 2017. Photo by Allen Pleus, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife

2- Dungeness Spit National Wildlife Refuge Deputy Project Leader with USFWS, Lorenz Sollmann, putting out traps for the European Green Crab with UW Dr. Sean McDonald in background. Photo by Allen Pleus, Washington Department of Fish & Wildlife at Dungeness Spit, Sequim, WA 2017.

 

EVENT: SCIENCE CAFE- Port Angeles, Sequim -PT Canceled- 4/25-6-7

Port Townsend has been canceled, but the other two are still on.

Science Cafe speaker schedule

EVENT: Celebration of Science Day in Port Angeles Saturday April 22nd

Science Celebration Poster

Science Celebration speaker schedule

Invasive Green Crabs found in Dungeness Refuge

This just in. The finding of these crabs in Dungeness  changes everything. This is a very real threat to our marine life as well as our sewer system outfalls, among other things. Those of us in the Marine Resources Committees and the county people, have known that green crabs were found randomly in isolated numbers west along the Canadian coast, and there have been limited findings of them at a few places around the north Sound. With this discovery though it means there is no turning back and stopping them is going to be very problematic, if it’s even possible. One crab can eat up to 45 clams a day and they reproduce worse than bunny rabbits or rats.

According to the USDA:

Impact: Preys on bivalves and other crustaceans, such as soft-shell clams and scallops (Grosholz and Ruiz 2002)

Heads up that 12 European green crab have been caught so far since last week at the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge. We have been working with USFWS and WA Sea Grant to support a limited rapid response and planning on setting up a stakeholder meeting in the next couple weeks to discuss implications and options. We’ve been in contact with Kelly Toy of Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe.

Allen Pleus
WDFW AIS and BW Unit Lead
(360) 902-2724 office
Allen.Pleus@dfw.wa.gov<mailto:Allen.Pleus@dfw.wa.gov>

Here is a fun short video about them.

Climate change causes glacial river in Yukon to change direction – CBC

No. This is not fake. Climate change is real and having real world affects. This appears to not affect anyone’s drinking water, but imagine if it were a river with millions of people living along it.

Glacier retreated so much that its meltwater switched course, in an event not documented in modern times. Brandie Weikle reports. (CBC)

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/technology/climate-change-yukon-river-piracy-1.4070153

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