Comment on Comments

Every so often I get a bunch of comments flood in on an article that are obviously from people not supportive of environmental protection.  Sometimes these comments are really over the top. All comments have to be cleared before they are put on the site. This is to keep this civil. Just to clarify my policy on what I allow and what I don’t.

Comments that are just simply criticism or legitimate debate are welcome. I never censor a person who is legitimately trying to raise a counterpoint or bring up a different side to the issue. As long as the author is respectful and doesn’t endup name calling or using put downs to make a point.

Any author who thinks that it is their right to be mean, using hateful putdowns and exhibiting abnormal behavior simply will be blocked. This is not a forum for all points of view, for that you can build your own site, but I welcome alternative arguements, and as you know, I am not shy about calling a person out when they present a point of view that is not well researched or seems to be an industry public relations person hiding behind a facade. To be clear, I worked in technical marketing myself and needed to present my company’s point of view in very hostile forums. I always held my opposition in respect, until they crossed their own lines and then I felt it valid to go on the attack.

So please, keep it civil, and you will get heard.

New species of flying squirrel discovered in Pacific Northwest – CBC

Still amazing that they are finding new species. And they are not even close relatives!

The northern flying squirrel can be found throughout British Columbia — but a new study has found that those living on the coast are a completely different species from those found inland for about a million years. The authors of the study analyzed the DNA of flying squirrel specimens collected throughout the Pacific Northwest, previously thought to be the exclusive domain of the northern flying squirrel. But those found on the Pacific coast between southern B.C. and northern California turned out to be genetically distinct from those found further inland. Matt Meuse reports. (CBC)

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/british-columbia/new-flying-squirrel-species-1.4154875

 

Climate Activists in Pacific Northwest Fight Construction of World’s Largest Methanol Refinery – Green Currents

Highly controversial proposal at the mouth of one of most important ecological river deltas.

Climate activists in the Pacific Northwest have rallied against a tsunami of fossil export proposals over the last five years:  coal, oil and the latest, petrochemical projects. The fight against a proposal to build the world’s largest methanol refinery on the banks of the Columbia River using fracked gas may be their biggest fight to date. Martha Baskin reports. (Green Currents)

http://www.truth-out.org/news/item/40900-climate-activists-in-pacific-northwest-fight-construction-of-world-s-largest-methanol-refinery

Lands commissioner fields barrage of questions during Port Angeles gathering – PDN

Glad to hear that Ms. Franz is out and circulating in the rural areas, getting feedback on her department’s plans. While this meeting may have been more talk than action, there needs to be talk first before action. We have far too much action without talk going on Washington D.C. these days. It seems that she prefers to listen, talk  and then make decisions.

The state Department of Natural Resources’ newest leader visited Port Angeles last week to unveil her agency’s newest initiative: a competitive technical staff assistance program to help rural communities develop their DNR assets. What recently elected state Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz received Thursday at a Clallam County Courthouse meeting packed with about 80 participants was an earful on topics ranging from unpredictable timber revenues to developing scuba-diving recreation opportunities. Paul Gottlieb reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/lands-commissioner-fields-barrage-of-questions-during-port-angeles-gathering/

 

EVENT:The Man Who Built the Sierra Club: A Life of David Brower

Sierra Club Robert Wyss June 2017

S’Klallam tribes apply for oyster aquaculture permit for Dabob Bay – Port Townsend Leader

It’s being reported in the Port Townsend Leader this morning that the Jamestown and Port Gamble S’Klallam tribes are proposing a new aquaculture farm on 10 acres in Dabob Bay. It’s worth noting that clamming and oyster harvesting are treaty resources of these tribes.

Pick up the leader or go online to read it. You will need to subscribe if you go online or purchase a copy at the newstand.

The public has until June 23 to comment on a proposed shoreline substantial development permit for 10 acres of suspended tumble oyster aquaculture, submitted by the Jamestown and Port Gamble S’Klallam tribes for Dabob Bay.

The tribes are proposing to produce shellfish – oysters and Manila clams – for human consumption

West Coast Ocean Acidification Rates Among Highest In World – KUOW

These findings spell bad news for our shellfish industry as well as our fisheries. It appears we are ground zero for ocean acidification and we have a administration in Washington D.C. that ignores any science that doesn’t fit it’s narrative. It’s all up to us folks. Thankfully we have a governor and representatives  in Olympia that still do believe in science.

The United States is stepping away from the Paris Climate Agreement, but the consequences of climate change will be more difficult to leave behind. Take ocean acidification, a major emerging threat to West Coast fisheries.

Researchers at Oregon State University have recorded some of the highest levels of ocean acidification in the world – and they exist right off the coast of the Pacific Northwest.

http://www.tinyurl.com/y7sjphuy

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