Washington State Legislative Update

Sent out by the Jefferson County Democrats

Hearings are underway for bills already introduced, comment periods are open, and things are moving very quickly. The legislature’s site for tracking all bills is here:  Bill Information

Lobby days in Olympia focus on causes. Many of the scheduled lobby days are listed here:
Lobby days
A few of the many important lobby days scheduled very soon are:
January 16 – Health Care for All Washington
January 16 – Climate Change Action Hearing
January 18 – NARAL Pro-Choice WA
January 23 – Immigrant and Refugee Rights Rally
February 1 – Housing and Homelessness Advocacy day
What other lobby days should we list? And who is organizing the car pools to attend?

Some bill trackers for important legislation are sponsored by the Northwest Progressive Institute:
https://www.nwprogressive.org/advocacy/
and the Washington Low-Income Housing Alliance:
http://wliha.org/advocacy/state/

How you can watch and participate in the legislative process from the comfort of your home.
A list of bills being considered by the state legislature was matched up with a Washington State Democratic priorities agenda. It isn’t comprehensive nor does it include all of many important bills being considered but it is a covers a lot (over 80 bills) that are important to Democrats on most issues. The dates and time of bill hearings is generally known a few days in advance only. The schedule is updated weekly and even daily. You can go here
2018 Bill Hearing Schedule
to find next weeks hearing schedules. That document is always being updated you can keep referring to it for updates. What you will see, for example:SB 6034    would allow county PUDs to provide end user telecommunications
When: 1/17   8:00
Comment hereClick on Senate Bill 6034 to learn more about the bill. Click on “Comment here” to leave a comment for the committee in charge of the bill.  “When” is the time the committee has scheduled a hearing on the bill. To watch any hearing on TVW, click on the bill, scroll down to available videos and watch live or later. So bookmark weekly 2018 bill hearings schedule or find it on the website.

Some important bills:

SB 6086, https://goo.gl/ruyF9s co-sponsored by Senator Kevin Van De Wege, would phase-out the pens as their leases expire. -Support this.

HB 2418, https://goo.gl/Gn2UNY co-sponsored by Representatives Chapman and Tharinger, would delay construction of new nonnative fin fish aquaculture facilities until thorough study, including structural analysis of existing facilities, is complete. – Do not support currently.

HB 2260 https://goo.gl/k4h8Ln would prohibit Atlantic salmon being used in aquaculture in Washington state. – Support this.

HB 2300 – Degrade protection for marbled murrelet.
HB 1026 – Health Security Trust.
SB 5701 – Apple Care Trust.
HB 1800 – Voting Rights Act (re-introduced)
SB 5991 – DISCLOSE Act, Increasing transparency of contributions.
HB 1075 – Capital Budget and HB 1080 – Bonds for Capital Budget. (Tharinger’s bills).
SB 5772 – Property Tax reform.
SB 5464 and HB 2059 – Washington Investment trust (Hasegawa’s bills).

 

 

 

Citing ‘Inexcusable’ Treatment, Advisers Quit National Parks Panel – NY Times

More shame heaped on the Trump Administration.

The majority of members of the National Parks System Advisory Board, which advises the federal government on management of the country’s national parks, have jointly resigned to protest Trump administration policies that the board members say have ignored science, squelched efforts to address climate change and undermined environmental protections. The advisory board was established in 1935 to advise the secretary of the interior, who oversees management of the country’s national parks and monuments. Since taking office last year, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has come under criticism from environmental advocates for promoting President Trump’s agenda of opening up the nation’s public lands and waters to fossil-fuel exploration, and for reducing the protection of public monuments. Coral Davenport reports. (NY Times)

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/16/climate/trump-national-parks.html

Pesticides and salmon: Can we see a light at the end of the tunnel? – Watching Our Water Ways

Once again, the National Marine Fisheries Service has determined in official findings that three common pesticides — chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion — raise the risk of extinction for threatened and endangered salmon. By extension, for the first time, the agency also concluded that those same pesticides threaten Puget Sound’s endangered orca population by putting their prey — chinook and other salmon — at risk. This politically and legally charged issue — which has been around for more than 15 years — has gone beyond a debate over potential harm from pesticides. It also raises uncomfortable questions about whether our society will follow science as we try to solve environmental problems. Chris Dunagan reports. (Watching Our Water Ways)

https://pugetsoundblogs.com/waterways/2018/01/16/pesticides-and-salmon-can-we-see-a-light-at-the-end-of-the-tunnel/

EVENT: Feb 3 – Volunteers needed to plant native trees along Dungeness River

Volunteers needed to plant native trees along Dungeness River on Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal property

NOSC

Jim Pearson planting at the Salmon Creek planting held on January 6th and 7th.

The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe and the North Olympic Salmon Coalition seek volunteers to help plant native trees along the Dungeness River on February 3rd, 2017. The planting will be completed along one of the Dungeness River’s former floodplains.

In January 2016, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe purchased the property that will be planted, with funding from Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration and Floodplains by Design. The restoration effort so far has involved removing three houses, including their septic and utilities, and revegetating the area in an attempt to restore it to its historic state of a floodplain. Floodplains are important as the take on excess water in times of flooding. Floodplains help to reduce the risk of damage when storms or snowmelt overwhelm the river banks. Floodplains also serve to provide cleaner water, habitat for fish and other wildlife, ground water recharge, and as flood storage. Reforestation of the floodplain along the Dungeness River will help to improve water quality and create healthy habitat for the fish and wildlife that frequent the area.

Tools and gloves will be provided, but are in limited supply so feel free to bring your own. The event will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m on February 3rd, and will include light refreshments and hot drinks. Bring warm, waterproof clothes and boots, water, and a lunch.

To receive directions, please RSVP to Katie at outreach@nosc.org or (360) 504-5611

About North Olympic Salmon Coalition:

The North Olympic Salmon Coalition is a non-regulatory non-profit organization that works with willing landowners and government agencies to perform salmon habitat restoration on the North Olympic Peninsula. Founded in 1990 by a group of dedicated community volunteers, the North Olympic Salmon Coalition was formed as one of fourteen Regional Fisheries Enhancement Groups in Washington State. Working in direct collaboration with Washington State, tribal governments and the communities of the Olympic Peninsula, we have spent the last 26 years restoring degraded and compromised habitat through both small and large-scale restoration projects. We utilize the efforts of our dedicated volunteers to increase the odds of salmon survival, foster community stewardship and promote the education of our youth. For more information or to volunteer, visit www.nosc.org or call 360-379-8051.

 

 

1/19 – Meeting set in Sequim on net pen bills – PDN

You can make your voice heard. Come to this meeting and let our Representatives know what you think, and that there is public support and momentum on the Peninsula for at least two of these bills.  I don’t currently support Chapman and Tharinger’s bill. There is already plenty of science on the dangers of Atlantic salmon in net pens.  They should be supporting a ban on the use of all net pens for non native fish now, and support scientific research (like that going on in Manchester) for the possible use of limited small net pens for native fish, (for unique one off reasons like species reintroduction, etc). Also state funding and support of upland fish farming should be encouraged. It is proven to work elsewhere, but the scale to make it economically viable is difficult. We should be encouraging these efforts, and helping tribes such as the Jamestown S’Klallam to understand if it’s worth doing.

SEQUIM — Sen. Kevin Van De Wege and Rep. Mike Chapman are expected to discuss legislation dealing with Atlantic salmon net pens at a meeting in Sequim. The meeting is set from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. Friday, Jan. 19 at the Sequim City Transit Center, 190 W. Cedar St.

Three bills related to net pens are making their way in the Legislature: Senate Bill 6086, House Bill 2418 and HB 2260.

SB 6086, https://goo.gl/ruyF9s co-sponsored by Van De Wege, would phase-out the pens as their leases expire.

HB 2418, https://goo.gl/Gn2UNY co-sponsored by Chapman and Tharinger, would delay construction of new nonnative fin fish aquaculture facilities until thorough study, including structural analysis of existing facilities, is complete.

HB 2260 https://goo.gl/k4h8Ln would prohibit Atlantic salmon being used in aquaculture in Washington state.

Read the whole story at:

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/meeting-set-in-sequim-on-net-pen-bills/

 

“Not all net pens are created equal” Jamestown S’Klallam weigh into the debate

We have a historic opportunity to end Atlantic net pen aquaculture in the U.S. Salish Sea (Puget Sound, The Strait of Juan de Fuca, Hood Canal, etc.). The bills moving through the State legislature right now have momentum, strong citizen backing, and likely something will pass. Voices that need to be heard, and are weighing in on this issue, are those of the Tribes,  who co-manage the aquaculture resources in the State, as well as use them for religious purposes. If you learn anything from working with them, remember this: The Tribes are not a single voice, but many voices. Recently, Kurt Grinnell weighed in on behalf of the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe. Kurt has been managing the Tribes aquaculture resources for many years. I have personally worked with Kurt in filming for the Tribe over many years for “Voices of the Strait” and “Treaty Resources”. I respect his point of view. Some may differ from him. But Kurt brings decades of real world experience in managing resources. He is a person that has embraced technology and innovation. He understands markets and the environment.

Our role right now is to finish the work in ending the in water farming of Atlantic salmon in these waters. Whether the technology of net pens is valid or not, should not be the issue. We need to get these non native fish out of our waters first. Kurt’s points, in the article below, are that perhaps there is a place for the technology of net pens in the future. Likely, in my opinion, it will be upland, closed containers, as that technology matures (which it is not, today).  Let’s focus on the goal at hand, rid our waters of this non native fish, and then focus on whether the technology can be used effectively or not. Maybe it can’t. But I’m willing to continue to favor letting Kurt and the Jamestown S’Klallam work to find out if it can.

http://www.sequimgazette.com/opinion/point-of-view-not-all-net-pens-are-created-equal/

The question is whether we want to import fish from countries where farmed seafood is unregulated, or whether we want to do our due diligence and use the best that science and technology have to offer in order to grow fish safely and sustainably in our own country.

I suggest that anyone wanting to see more about what the Jamestown S’Klallam are doing to research new ways of doing aquaculture take a moment and view the short film I did a few years ago for them on the Point Whitney facility.

Health, environmental threats focus of legislative efforts for state senator – PDN

Good short article on some of the legislative bills our Peninsula legislators are working on. We support them all.

Van De Wege, D-Sequim — who represents the 24th District with Rep. Steve Tharinger, D-Sequim, and Rep. Mike Chapman, D-Port Angeles — will be in the thick of discussions to resolve all these issues. The 24th District covers Clallam and Jefferson counties and part of Grays Harbor County.

https://www.peninsuladailynews.com/politics/health-environmental-threats-focus-of-legislative-efforts-for-state-senator/

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