Can Olympia oysters make a comeback in Quilcene Bay? – PT Leader

Good work being done by the Jefferson Marine Resources Committee, now expanding their efforts to restore the Olympia Oyster from Dungeness Bay to Quilcene.

Many hands sought to make relatively light work out of an ambitious undertaking May 16 in Quilcene, as roughly a dozen volunteers assembled at the end of Linger Longer Road to take stock of the area’s remaining Olympia oyster population. Before over-harvesting and pulp mill pollution forced Pacific Northwest oyster farmers to turn to the Pacific oysters of Japan as a substitute, Olympia oysters were the dominant native species, and various environmental and oyster farming-affiliated groups are keen to see the molluscs make a comeback. Brian Allen, a marine ecologist with the Puget Sound Restoration Fund (PSRF), instructed the volunteers who arrived at the Quilcene Boat Ramp to record not only where they found any Olympia oysters as the tide went out, but also where the oysters tend to aggregate. Kirk Boxleitner reports. (Port Townsend Leader)

Can Olympia oysters make a comeback in Quilcene Bay?

Job listing: P/T Program Assistant – Jefferson MRC

 

2018 Program Assistant Job Posting – Temporary, Part-time 

APPOINTMENT:   July 1 – Nov. 30, 2018.  Total of 325 hours over 5 months. 

ORGANIZATION/LOCATION:   Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee (MRC), based at the WSU Extension Office, 121 Oak Bay Rd, Port Hadlock, WA  98339  

SALARY:   $20.00/hour, no benefits. Workdays and times will vary.  

JOB DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES:  This person will assist the MRC in bringing stormwater-related educational programs and activities to 3-5 communities or neighborhoods in Jefferson County.   

TASKS:  The Program Assistant will:  

  • Write and submit short articles on stormwater management and rain gardens for community/neighborhood newsletters 
  • Work with each community association’s board or designated committee to plan and implement at least one action-based program 
  • Establish a mechanism for disseminating and managing short-term community incentive programs that would encourage participation and collaboration 
  • Submit press releases to the Peninsula Daily News, Port Townsend Leader newspapers, and other local news outlets 
  • Utilize social media to disseminate announcements, invitations to participate, and project news 
  • Work with volunteers to assemble public outreach table displays and provide staffing for selected community events 
  • Share written materials with 2 other MRCs 

 

SUPERVISED BY:  Bob Simmons (WSU Extension) and Cheryl Lowe (MRC Coordinator) 

 

QUALIFICATIONS:  

The successful applicant will be self-directed and motivated; able to work independently; and have strong organizational skills. S/he must have a demonstrated ability to communicate effectively (verbally and in writing) with diverse audiences; be familiar with online technology including website updates and social media tools: and have experience working with volunteers. Some knowledge of stormwater issues and/or experience with environmental education is preferred.  

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:  

  • The applicant must be at least 18 years old and have completed at least one year of post-secondary coursework.  
  • Successful completion of a background check.  
  • Possess a valid WA driver’s license and have reliable transportation with current automobile liability insurance. 

APPLICATION & DEADLINE:  

Submit a letter of intent and resume to the Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee at Cheryl.lowe@wsu.edu . 

 

Deadline for submitting application is June 7, 2018. 

 

In your letter of intent, please answer the following questions:  

  • Why do you want to be an MRC Program Assistant?  
  • How do you see yourself contributing to the stormwater management effort through this position?  
  • What skills do you have that will be particularly useful for this position?  
  • How does this position fit into your future plans?  
  • How do you think you will benefit from this position?  

A selection committee will review the submitted materials and contact qualified applicants to schedule interviews, tentatively scheduled for June 14-15. Hiring decisions will be made within the following 2 weeks.   

 

Nurse to run against Chapman – PDN

So a self described supporter of Donald Trump (“he has grown on me”), pro NRA, against helping house low income people in our community, against supporting more money for education, against environmental protections, and against lowering property taxes (which was done by the Democrats after the Republicans, when in power, raised them radically which was one good reason that the low income  housing initiative failed), is going to challenge Mike Chapman. Should be an interesting race.

I don’t think that the Democrats should underestimate this woman’s ability to run against Rep. Chapman. Clallam county is a mixed bag when it comes to voting and could very likely go for Ms. Wilke. Her politics won’t play in Port Townsend, but might in the central and south county.

Port Townsend Republican Jodi Wilke said Monday she opposes the one-term Democratic incumbent’s yes vote on using the rainy-day surplus to pay for education and for property tax relief.

Wilke, 58, also is against additional gun regulations on assault-style rifles and bump stocks, a rifle-firepower accessory, and says the state Department of Natural Resources has overstepped its authority on rules setting aside marbled murrelet habitat, claiming the state Legislature should have more say in setting policy.

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/politics/nurse-to-challenge-chapman-for-district-state-rep-seat/

A Fight Over Salmon-Killing Roads Is Now A Supreme Court Case About Native Rights – KUOW

Well, it’s coming down to a Supreme Court showdown over how fast we have to replace the culverts, which have been proven to be keeping returning salmon from getting to spawning streams. This is part of 100 years or more of destruction of salmon habitat and the Tribes are pretty hard core about us getting this done sooner than later, given returning salmon numbers.

Seventeen years ago, 21 tribes sued the state of Washington to fix those culverts. On April 18, the U.S. Supreme Court is scheduled to take on the case. The question is whether or not state taxpayers should have to dish out billions to dig up roads so salmon can get through. And the court’s decision will have repercussions for tribes all over the West and Midwest. Eilis O’Neill reports. (KUOW)

http://kuow.org/post/fight-over-salmon-killing-roads-now-supreme-court-case-about-native-rights

Navy wants to use more Washington state parks for stealth SEAL training – Seattle Times

Just say no to this insanity! Please let your state and federal representatives know how you feel.

The Navy wants to use 29 state maritime parks for stealth SEAL training, but state parks officials have yet to begin a review of the plan and say approval is no sure thing.

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/navy-wants-more-washington-state-parks-for-stealth-seal-training/?utm_source=marketingcloud&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Morning+Brief+3-12-18_3_12_2018

Thousands more trees planted on Tarboo Creek during Plant-A-Thon – PDN

In one day, 180 volunteers planted 4,300 native trees and shrubs along Tarboo Creek. The Northwest Watershed Institute’s Plant-A-Thon, an annual event since 2005, was held this year on Feb. 4. Volunteers from area schools worked to restore salmon and wildlife habitat, as well as reduce climate change impacts, by planting 2,300 native trees, and installing 2,000 live stakes of willow and other native shrubs along Tarboo Creek, said Jude Rubin, director of stewardship and public involvement for Northwest Watershed Institute (NWI). The Plant-A-Thon has become the largest environmental service project in East Jefferson County, Rubin said. (Peninsula Daily News)

https://www.peninsuladailynews.com/life/thousands-more-trees-planted-on-tarboo-creek-during-plant-a-thon/

5 counties warned state about salmon-farming back in 2012 – Everett Herald

A good review of the work done in the last ten years fighting net pen salmon. Here in Jefferson County, it was work by the Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee, which voted to recommend supporting the SMP language that would ban net pens in the county, and followed by the support of all three county commissioners, especially now retired Commissioner Phil Johnson.

Not long ago, some of the loudest political voices railing against the danger of farming Atlantic salmon in the waters of Puget Sound came from within chambers of county governments. Back in 2012, leaders of Island, Whatcom, Jefferson, Skagit and San Juan counties — Democrat and Republican — called for a moratorium on such fish farm operations. They also sought authority to include a ban on them in their respective shoreline management plans. They reached out to executives in state agencies as well as former Gov. Chris Gregoire and, later, Gov. Jay Inslee. They lobbied lawmakers and sought backing of tribes in their quest. “While Washington state missteps with outdated science, local governments desiring to recognize modern science, job, and environmental and public threats, ask that they be permitted to ban these open finfish feedlots before they destroy the native species, their habitats, and the jobs we have worked so diligently to protect,” former Island County Commissioner Angie Homola wrote in a six-page issue paper delivered to Inslee in August 2014. Jerry Cornfield reports. (Everett Herald)

http://www.heraldnet.com/news/5-counties-warned-state-about-salmon-farming-back-in-2012/

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