EVENT: State attorney general Ferguson, DNR commissioner Franz to speak Aug. 25 at Democrats’ annual Fish Feast

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, undefeated in 22 lawsuits so far against the Trump administration, will be one of two keynote speakers Sunday, Aug. 25, at the 25th annual Fish Feast in Port Townsend of the Jefferson County Democrats. Its theme this year: “There’s a Lot on the Line.”

Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz, who spearheaded the development of a 10-year statewide plan to fight and prevent wildfires, will be the other keynote speaker.

Tickets for the event at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds are available for $60 at jeffcodemocrats.com and by mail at Jefferson County Democrats, P. O. Box 85, Port Townsend, WA 98368. Tickets will also be available at the door (cash, check or card).

Doors open at 4 p.m. for the bar and socializing in the Erickson Building. Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m., and speakers begin at 6 p.m. The party donates one dollar of each ticket to the Jefferson County Fair Board.

“The Fish Feast is our major fundraiser of the year,” said party Chair Marty Gilmore. “Each ticket purchase supports the vital work we do year-round to elect Democrats! It’s also an opportunity to hear the latest on current issues from our guest speakers – and fun time to see friends.”

Recent successes by Ferguson’s office include the largest-ever trial award in a state consumer protection case, debt relief from predatory lending for hundreds of students, and defense of the constitution by defeating the Trump administration’s attempt to add a discriminatory citizenship question to the 2020 Census.

Franz’s office has led state efforts to make Washington’s lands resilient in the face of climate change, investing in carbon sequestration and clean energy with wind, solar and geothermal infrastructure. Her office has also allocated millions of dollars to struggling rural communities to spark economic opportunities.

Fish Feast attendees will also hear from U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, state Sen. Kevin Van de Wege, state Reps. Mike Chapman and Steve Tharinger, state party chair Tina Podlodowski, and local Democratic elected officials.

Before the feast is served, guests can mingle with candidates, campaigns, and organizations in Campaign Alley outside the Oscar Erickson Building.

Rep. Kilmer has sponsored tickets for 20 Young Democrats (under 35 years old). Contact Libby Wennstrom (360-301-9728) or Chelsea Pronovost (425-256-0626) to pre-register as a guest.

“We’re also offering 20 discounted tickets at our cost,” said Fish Feast organizer Claire Roney. “$25 each – first come, first serve.” For more information—or to volunteer for the Fish Feast, contact Roney at (360) 531-1177.

The Fish Feat menu will include sockeye salmon from Key City Fish, BBQed by chef Larry Dennison; shellfish from Taylor Shellfish; greens and veggies from local farms; rolls from Pane d’Amore; and cake. Beverages will include wine from the Wine Seller and beer from Port Townsend Brewing Co.

For more information about the Jefferson County Democrats, visit its website at jeffcodemocrats.com or its Facebook page, @jeffcodemocrats.

Port Townsend drinking water free of toxins despite algae growth, officials say – PDN

Another possible effect of global warming? The end of our water source for Port Townsend. This is a canary in the coal mine kind of event. It isn’t necessarily about to end, but if this becomes a normal event, which is likely as the planet warms, then we need to start working on finding an alternative source of water, or a way to make the water purified.

Although recent tests on Port Townsend’s reservoirs have discovered they contain blue-green algae, which can create toxins, the water is safe for drinking, city officials said. City Manager David Timmons said Wednesday that results of tests for toxins, which arrived Sept. 20, showed levels lower than the minimum detection level. Cydney McFarland reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/port-townsend-drinking-water-free-of-toxins-despite-algae-growth-officials-say/

Navy, Noise and Sealife – News & Event

From the people at The West Coast Action Alliance and the Olympic Forest Coalition
http://westcoastactionalliance.org and http://olympicforest.org

Noise in the sea is killing and injuring wildlife. The numbers are shocking. The online news organization Truthout published their top story this morning, on the excessively high numbers of marine mammals the US Navy is allowed to “take” as a result of exploding mines and bombs and using sonar in sensitive habitats during testing and training exercises. Truthout senior investigative reporter Dahr Jamail researched and wrote it after noticing this post from the West Coast Action Alliance:

Coincidentally, the New York Times wrote last week that Navy sonar “cannot be ruled out as cause of death” for dolphins in Southern California.

Which brings us to this: 23 organizations are sponsoring a showing of the movie “Sonic Sea” on Monday, May 23 from 7-9 PM at the Quimper Unitarian Universalist Fellowship (QUUF) in Port Townsend, Washington, 2333 San Juan Avenue. The eye-opening film reveals how noise from Navy sonar, drilling operations and everyday vessel traffic adversely impacts whales and other sea life. (Watch trailer here.)  A donation of $10 is suggested at the door.

Two world renowned experts and cast members will be at the screening – Ken Balcomb of the Center for Whale Research and Michael Jasny of the National Resources Defense Council. They will speak and, after the film, lead a Q&A session. (Press release here.)  If you are not in the area, check this site for more screenings, or to host one in your area. To learn more, download theOcean Noise Report.

Spawning Gumboot Chiton

Photographer Bruce Kerwin captured a Gumboot Chiton releasing eggs into the water column at Point Hudson – Port Townsend, WA

DSC_5116 Spawning Gumboot Chiton - Port Townsend

Photo of the Day -Juvenile Puget Sound King Crab at Point Hudson

Another gem from Bruce Kerwin of Bainbridge Island. DSC_4425 Juvenile Puget Sound King CrabJuvenile Puget Sound King Crab at Point Hudson (eventually the white cap will disappear and he will grow to more than 4 times its current size) – Port Townsend, WA;

Photo of the Day – Gumboot Chiton by Bruce Kerwin

DSC_5133 Gumboot Chiton - Port Townsend

Gumboot Chiton releasing eggs into the water column at Point Hudson – Port Townsend, WA; March, 2015

CANCELED -Event: JLT Natural History Society presents: Bees and Biodiversity

Jerry FreilichWith high wind warnings for this evening, we have consulted with our
“Bees & Biodiversity” speaker, Jerry Freilich, and decided it’s best
to postpone our event.

We’re now planning for this event to take place at 7:00 pm on Thursday
January 7, in the same location, QUUF. We appreciate your
understanding, and hope to see you then!
On Thursday, December 3, the JLT Natural History Society will sponsor a presentation on Bees and Biodiversity by Jerry Freilich, former director of the North Coast and Cascades Science Learning Network. An entomologist by training, Freilich coordinated scientific research in Olympic National Park. He has researched insect biodiversity since 1996, and recently carried out a project to find and identify as many bee species as possible in Olympic National Park.

Most people can name perhaps three or four kinds of bees. They are surprised to learn that close to 4,000 species of native bees inhabit North America, (this doesn’t including honey bees, which were introduced by European settlers). Freilich will explain why bees are so difficult to study. Most are tiny, fast-flying, and inconspicuous. They go about their jobs, don’t interact with people, and generally fly below human ‘radar’.

Across North America, native bees can be found any place where flowers bloom. They have been pollinating the continent’s flowering plants since long before the arrival of honey bees. Even in today’s vastly altered landscapes, these champion pollinators continue to service the majority of native plants, as well as important human-cultivated varieties such as tomatoes, eggplants, pumpkins, cherries, blueberries, and cranberries.

The program begins at 7 pm in the QUUF’s sanctuary hall on San Juan Avenue, Port Townsend. This event is free and open to the public, with a suggested donation of five dollars.

http://jltnatural.org/2015/11/02/bees-and-biodiversity/

 

CONTACT: Noreen Parks, 379-4007

Port Townsend City Council puts water restrictions into effect – PDN

So we are now in Phase 1 drought condition.The city is looking for everyone to effect a 10% reduction in water use. Please water only on every other day, which frankly, if you are doing it correctly, you should already be doing! Your ornamentals, if they are not native and drought tolerant, should be only watered deeply once a week. I’ve noticed that my drought tolerant natives and grasses are not seeming to need any water this summer. Soak the roots of the most vulnerable ones. The mill is being addressed separately.Odd that the Co-op is using more water than Safeway!? Charlie Bermant reports.

The Port Townsend City Council on Monday night unanimously approved Stage 1 water restrictions that include requiring outdoor watering on alternate days.

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20150804/NEWS/308049981/port-townsend-city-council-puts-water-restrictions-into-effect

Lack of water could temporarily shut down Port Townsend Paper Corp. mill – PDN

Charlie Berman reports on the ongoing discussions between the city of Port Townsend and the PT Paper Mill Corp. As stated in the article, it appears that the City is using approx. 2 Million gallons a day (previous estimates I’ve read placed it at 1 M gallons but perhaps this is based on older information). The mill uses approx 8 Million gallons a day currently,and even in temporary shutdown could still use a significant amount. Read the whole story and support local journalism by subscribing to the Peninsula Daily News.

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20150720/NEWS/307209975/lack-of-water-could-temporarily-shut-down-port-townsend-paper-corp

Citizen science proves a draw for new program manager at Port Townsend Marine Science Center – PDN

We wish Susan all the best. Looks like she is a great new hire for the role.

Programs in which volunteers participate in science research attracted the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s new program manager to the nonprofit organization. “One of the things that drew me to the marine science center is its reputation for citizen science, and I think that’s been kept secret,” said Susan Bullerdick, who started her new position last Sunday….  She worked for the Seattle Aquarium for 10 years. For seven of those years, she served as the operations manager for Centers for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE), a collaboration among the Seattle Aquarium, the Ocean Inquiry Project and the University of Washington Oceanography department and College of Education. Charlie Bermant reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20150304/news/303049997/citizen-science-proves-a-draw-for-new-program-manager-at-port

$1.12 million rain garden project in Port Angeles nears completion – PDN

New raingardens are being implemented in PA and here in PT. WSU  will be doing some talking about them today, actually.

A $1.12 million stormwater project in west Port Angeles to relieve flooding and improve stormwater runoff water quality is nearly complete. The city has installed rain gardens at eight intersections on South H, K, L and M streets, as well as a new, larger drain pipe system to relieve flood problems on South H Street. Rain gardens are designed to transfer surface stormwater to groundwater by providing planted “wells” for water to pool and soak into the ground, rather than entering the stormwater system, and to provide a natural filter for surface stormwater. Arwyn Rice reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20141120/NEWS/311209986/-112-million-rain-garden-project-in-port-angeles-nears-completion

And in Port Townsend:

Catching the Rain: Rain Gardens 101

Thurs. Nov. 20, 5-6 pm

WSU Extension Office, 380 Jefferson St, Port Townsend

Stormwater from landscapes and roadways is the number one contributor of pollutants to Puget Sound.  Bob Simmons, Water Resources Specialist with WSU Extension, is presenting a free 1-hour seminar on the basics of rain gardens–how rain gardens help improve water quality, what rain gardens are and how they work, and the four steps to creating and sustaining a rain garden.  The newest “how to” manual from WSU will be also available (or you can download it from www.raingarden.wsu.edu).  Attending this workshop provides an introduction to the Nov. 24-25th installation events, but is not required to participate in those events.

 

Please RSVP to Sally Chapin, WSU Extension (360-379-5610 x 200 or wsujeffersoncounty@gmail.com.).

Rain Garden Planting

Mon, Nov. 24, 1 – 4 pm

Tues Nov. 25, 9 am – 12 noon

Garfield St., Port Townsend

Learn by doing, whether you are new to rain gardens or already a pro.  Join WSU Extension, Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee and the City of Port Townsend as we install two new rain gardens on Garfield Street.  WSU experts Erica Guttman and Bob Simmons will provide instruction and answer all your questions as we plant two new rain gardens to treat stormwater before it flows into Port Townsend Bay. Bring your own digging tools, gloves, etc. More details when you register.

 

Please RSVP to Sally Chapin, WSU Extension (360-379-5610 x 200 or wsujeffersoncounty@gmail.com.).  Let her know which workday(s) you prefer.

PT Event: Rain Garden Installation and Training Nov 20 and 25

The MRC rain garden project on Garfield Street, Port Townsend, will be installed next week. This project is in partnership with the MRC, City of Port Townsend and WSU Extension.  Rain gardens are a great way to mitigate storm water runoff that ends up in storm sewers that empty into the Salish Sea (check out the large one next to the Maritime Center in PT for example. It drains much of the streets above the site).
WSU Extension is also offering a 1-hour educational intro to rain gardens.  We’d love your participation for any of the associated activities—invite a friend!. Here’s a summary:
CATCHING THE RAIN: AN INTRO TO RAIN GARDENS  Thursday, November 20; 5 pm
Storm water from landscapes and roadways is the number one contributor of pollutants to Puget Sound.  Bob Simmons, Water Resources Specialist with WSU Extension, is providing a 1-hour seminar at the WSU Extension offices (380 Jefferson St, Port Townsend)  to help you learn what rain gardens are and how they work, and the four steps to creating and sustaining a rain garden.  WSU Rain Garden Handbooks (the newest “how to” manual from WSU) will be available at the workshop.   To register for the 1-hour program, call WSU Jefferson Extension at 360-379-5610 ext 200 or email wsujeffersoncounty@gmail.com .
 
INSTALLING RAIN GARDENS  Mon. Nov. 24 from 1-4 pm & Tues. Nov. 25 from 9 am-12
 
Sign up for a hands-on opportunity to help install a rain garden on Mon. Nov. 24 and/or Tues. Nov. 25 . To register for the installation project, see contact info above. You do not need to attend the evening lecture to volunteer for the installation.

Event: How Do Our Hazardous Waste Site Cleanups Compare?

Thursday, November 20, 2014

6:30 PM   The Landing Mall – Second Floor

115E.Railroad Avenue     Port Angeles WA

           HOW DO OUR HAZARDOUS WASTE SITE CLEANUPS COMPARE?

Dr. Peter L. deFur will be in Port Angeles on Thursday, November 20 to give a presentation comparing cleanup sites on which he is working in USEPA Region 10 — Rayonier-Port Angeles Harbor, Seattle Duwamish River and Portland Harbor.

He will cover the contaminants at each site, compare cleanup options and plans for each site, cover alternative cleanup methods available to be used on particular contaminants, and compare agency support of the citizen groups at the different sites.

These cleanups are overseen by the WA State Department of Ecology and/or the USEPA.  In WA State, these cleanups are part of the Puget Sound Partnership Cleanup Initiative.  The Rayonier-Port Angeles Harbor and the Duwamish River are  Ecology priority cleanup sites.

Dr. Peter L. deFur is president and owner of the consulting firm Environmental Stewardship Concepts, LLC, based in Henrico VA.  and an Affiliate Associate Professor in the Center for Environmental Studies at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) in Richmond VA.   Dr. deFur has research and practical experience in the areas of ecological risk assessment, environmental regulations and policies, and toxicology.

Dr. deFur received his B.S. and M.A. degrees in Biology from the College of William and Mary, in Virginia, and a Ph.D. in Biology from the University of Calgary, Alberta.  He has held faculty positions at George Mason University and Southeastern Louisiana University before joining the staff of the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) in Washington, DC.  In 1996, deFur formed an independent private consulting firm, Environmental Stewardship Concepts, LLC, and accepted a part-time position at VCU.

Dr. deFur has extensive experience in human health risk assessment and ecological risk assessment regulations, guidance and policy. He served on the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council (NAS/NRC )Risk Characterization Committee that prepared Understanding Risk, on several subsequent study committees and served on the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology from 1996 to 1999. He presently serves on the/NRC/NAS committee on Uranium Mining in Virginia. He served on a number of scientific reviews of EPA ecological and human health risk assessments, including the Framework for Cumulative Risk Assessment, the assessment for the WTI incinerator in Ohio and EPA’s Ecological Risk Assessment Guidelines. Dr. deFur was a member of each of the three federal advisory committees for EPA’s Endocrine Disruptor Screening and Testing Program. Dr. deFur was chair of the peer review of EPA’s Dioxin Reassessment in 2000.

Contact:

Darlene Schanfald

Project Coordinator

Rayonier –  Port Angeles Harbor Hazardous Waste Cleanup Project

Olympic Environmental Council Coalition

PO Box 2664

Sequim WA  98382

360-681-7565

darlenes@olympus.net

EVENT: 16 October – Wolf Talk with David Moskowitz

PORT TOWNSEND – Join the JLT Natural History Society and Western Wildlife Outreach on Thursday, October 16, for an entertaining evening of “Wolf Talk” with David Moskowitz, well-known wildlife tracker and author of Wolves in the Land of Salmon. Moskowitz will share stories, images, and video clips from the recent OR7 Expedition, which retraced the wanderings of a young male gray wolf, who traversed more than 1,200 miles through Oregon and into California.

OR-12_Wenaha_male_wolf_odfwThe wolf dubbed OR7 was captured and outfitted with a GPS collar in 2011 by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, to follow his journey via satellite signals across multiple mountain ranges, a vast desert, and past numerous towns and cities along the way. OR7 made international news as he wandered to California, becoming the first wolf to be documented there in 90 years. In the spring of 2014 Moskowitz, along with a filmmaker and other stalwart participants, launched an expedition to follow the approximate path of OR7 on foot and by bicycle. The adventurous mission led the team to fresh insights on what it means to share the landscape with large carnivores in the contemporary world.

David will be joined by local carnivore experts, Lorna and Darrell Smith, of the non-profit Western Wildlife Outreach (WWO), who will discuss Washington’s recovering gray wolf population. WWO is a Port Townsend based organization dedicated to providing accurate, science-based information on bears, wolves, and cougars. The organization aims to promote wildlife-safe communities, at the same time striving to restore and maintain healthy populations of these iconic animals, whose roots in the Pacific Northwest extend to millions of years ago.

David Moskowitz is a professional wildlife tracker, photographer, and outdoor educator. He has contributed his technical expertise to a wide variety of wildlife studies, employing tracking and other non-invasive methods to study wildlife ecology and promote conservation. Moscowitz helped establish the Cascade Citizen Wildlife Monitoring Project, whose participants search for and observe rare and sensitive wildlife in the Cascades and other Northwest wildlands.

The Natural History Society is an offshoot organization of the Jefferson Land Trust. It was founded in 2012 to foster active exploration, appreciation, understanding, and conservation of the diverse natural environments of the Olympic Peninsula and beyond.

The “Wolf Talk” program will take place at 7:00 pm, Thursday, October 16, at the Cotton Building, 607 Water Street, Port Townsend. This event is free and open to the public. A $5 donation will help defray the costs and support future programs.

For additional information contact:
Noreen Parks
360 379-4007
HYPERLINK “mailto:noreen.parks@gmail.com” noreen.parks@gmail.com

EVENT – Oct 7 – Community Forum on Ocean Health


Ocean_Health_Forum-100714

Please join us for a free evening event featuring guest speakers Dr. Simone Alin, Supervisory Oceanographer at NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Lab; and Betsy Peabody, the Director of Puget Sound Restoration Fund. You’ll learn about changes in the marine waters of Puget Sound, and what’s being done to address them by some of the amazing people who live and work here.

Tuesday, October 7

6:30 PM-8:00 PM (Doors open at 6 PM)

Northwest Maritime Center

Maritime Meeting Room (2nd floor of yellow building)

Port Townsend, WA 98368

This event is sponsored by the Northwest Straits Commission, Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee (MRC), and Puget Sound Restoration Fund.

All are welcome.

Caroline Gibson    –    Marine Program Manager

Northwest Straits Commission

431 Water Street

Port Townsend, WA 98368

360.385.1153 (PT office)

www.nwstraits.org

Peninsula marine life centers losing sea stars to mysterious disease – PDN

Visitors to the North Olympic Peninsula’s two major marine science centers are likely to see few sea stars. Sea star wasting disease, which has decimated wild populations, also is tearing through captive collections. The disease has accelerated this summer, said staff members at both the Feiro Marine Life Center in Port Angeles and the Port Townsend Marine Life Center. Arwyn Rice reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Read the rest of the story at the Peninsula Daily News. Subscribe and support local journalism.

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20140728/NEWS/307289990/peninsula-marine-life-centers-losing-sea-stars-to-mysterious-disease

MV Salish ferry now equipped with device to gather Admiralty Inlet data – PDN

The state ferries system has attached a device to the hull of the MV Salish on the Port Townsend-Coupeville route to provide data on low-oxygen water and ocean acidification from Admiralty Inlet….  Charlie Bermant reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20140616/NEWS/306169994/mv-salish-ferry-now-equipped-with-device-to-gather-admiralty-inlet

Small sewage leak closes Port Townsend’s North Beach – PDN

A “no contact” advisory is in effect for the waters off North Beach Park in Port Townsend, where city officials reported an intermittent leak of treated sewage Monday. Jefferson County Public Health issued the health advisory for all of North Beach, with warning signs at the county park. The public is advised to avoid surfing, swimming, boating, fishing and the harvesting of shellfish and seaweed at North Beach. Shellfishing always is closed in the area because of the proximity of the sewage plant outfall. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20140225/NEWS/302259980/small-sewage-leak-closes-port-townsends-north-beach

UPDATE: This has been repaired and is no longer a threat, though the beach there is always closed to shellfish harvest because the outfall is out there. 3/7/2014.

Environmental Lobby Day is no more…

Washington Environmental Council (WEC), who took over the remains of People For Puget Sound after it’s collapse  a few years ago, continued the long running and highly successful Environmental Lobby Day in Olympia. No longer.  WEC has determined that the event needs to die to continue to live. So they are running a new program this year, called 60 Days/60 Ways Action Plan. Here’s how they describe it:

Get Involved! 60 Days/60 Ways Action Plan
This legislative session we’re trying something new and exciting. We’re going to be interacting with legislators throughout the entire session. We have 60 days and 60 ways to help. What does this mean for you? We know you’re busy and time is limited, so whether it’s volunteering one evening at a phone bank, sharing a post on social media, or attending your local town-hall meeting, we’re giving legislators 60 days and you 60 ways to get involved.

Doorbell Days
Every Priority campaign will have at least one doorbell day during this legislative session. These days will entail passing out campaign information to targeted voters in the legislators’ own backyards.

Town Halls
Organized by your local legislators, we have two goals: to pack the room with constituents, and get at least one activist to the microphones to ask a question on each Priority.

Local Party Meetings
This includes attending legislators’ party meetings (both Democrat and Republican) and asking to put our issues on the agenda when appropriate.

Constituent Meetings
Every week during the legislative session we will have one weekly grasstop constituent meeting with a targeted legislator at their office in Olympia. The meetings will be a chance to talk about each Priority.

Phonebanks
Most phonebanks will be run out of offices in Seattle, but option may be available to call at home. Phonebanks will call voters in targeted areas to educate the public and legislators on our Priority campaigns.

Literature Drops
Each Priority will have at least one ‘drop’ day in Olympia. A local team of volunteers will canvas the campus with literature or some related item, infographic, or educational piece that will be distributed to all legislators.

Social Media Shares – Facebook/Twitter
Campaigns will develop weekly Facebook and Twitter feeds that will be posted and sent to share. They will include pictures, graphics, interesting facts, or links to action alerts.

You can sign up if interested, here: http://environmentalpriorities.org/

Last year, over 300 people attended Environmental Lobby Day, spending time learning about issues, meeting with their State Senators and Representatives.  I’m hoping that the folks at WEC/P4PS will make sure they have their metrics for the success of this new idea dialed in. I always had a lot of good feedback from people who came to the Lobby Day, and it introduced people to their elected officials, as well as to their power in calling for change. Losing the momentum of Environmental Lobby Day to push out to a indistinct cloud of people who you hope will actually take actions over a much longer period of time is fraught with possible problems. Hoping that we see some real successes with this tactic.

Along those lines, as posted here elsewhere, Representative Kevin Van De Wege is going to be holding a public meeting in Port Townsend to discuss his involvement with the Toxic Coalition leader Laurie Valerino at the PT Community Center. See the other post here for details.

Photography of Jellyfish on Display in Port Townsend

Jellyfish are some of the most beautiful animals in nature. Superbly designed to float with little or no propulsion.  Linda Sutton, a Port Townsend photographer, will be displaying a selection of works from three of her series at The Spice and Tea Exchange, 929 Water Street, Port Townsend beginning November 30, 2013 and continuing through the holidays. Hours are daily from 10am to 6pm. The store and display will be open during Art Walk, December 7, 5:30-8.

Included in the display: “The Jellies,” series of high contrast black and white photographs, “Edge of Day,” that special low light time that is so fabulous, and “Floral/Leaf,” the celebration of nature.

“The Jellies” are low light photographs taken at various aquariums using high speed black and white film pushed to the limit. The large prints were hand printed in a darkroom from the extremely thin negatives using a fiber-based graded paper that is no longer available.

Linda Sutton has exhibited locally at the Northwind Arts Center, Olympic Art Gallery/Quilcene, Metro Bagel/PT and Hadlock, Muskan Restaurant in Port Townsend, and Sunrise Dental in Sequim. Prior to moving to Port Townsend, her photography was exhibited throughout California.

All photographs are archivally framed by her husband, Dan Sutton, a Certified Picture Framer and former officer of the Professional Picture Framers Association.

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