NOSC is hiring!

From Rebecca Benjamin the Executive Director of NOSC.


Dear Friends and Colleagues,The North Olympic Salmon Coalition is excited to announce… we’re hiring!

The Salmon Coalition is seeking a highly skilled, friendly, and dedicated person to join the team as Membership & Office Administrator.

This position plays a core role in the day to day function of the Salmon Coalition and maintains efficient administration of the membership program as well as a variety of program and organizational support.

Please pass this posting along to anyone you know that might be interested. The job announcement can be found here.

Position: Membership and Office Administrator

FLSA Status: Part Time, Non-exempt

Hours: Monday – Friday, 25 hours per week

Pay: $18-$21/hour

Location: Port Hadlock, WA    Reports to: Executive Director

Summary:

The North Olympic Salmon Coalition (NOSC) is excited to add a part-time Membership and Office Administrator to their team.  NOSC works to promote robust wild salmon stocks for families, fishers, and local economies by furthering habitat restoration and education on the North Olympic Peninsula. We are one of fourteen Regional Fisheries Enhancement Groups in Washington State, working directly with State agencies, tribal governments and local communities across the Olympic Peninsula. This busy non-profit has 7 employees, an office in Port Hadlock and in Port Angeles, and is governed by a board of directors.

The Membership and Office Administrator plays a core role in the day to day function of the NOSC and maintains efficient administration of the membership program as well as a variety of program and organizational support. A friendly, skilled and dedicated Administrator is needed to keep office systems running smoothly and to ensure compliance with state and federal policies and internal administrative processes.  Administration of the membership program is a core function of a successful fundraising program.  Accurate record keeping, meaningful reporting and timely acknowledgement of donations perpetuates a successful fundraising effort.  The membership portion of this position is core to the fundraising committee’s success and will play a support role through promotion of fundraising drives and events, effective administration of gifts, and through friendly and heart-felt acknowledgement of gifts.

Areas of Responsibility

  1. Office Management and Administration
  2. Membership and Donations
  3. Bookkeeping and Billing
  4. Program and organizational support to the office and executive director in a variety of areas

Qualifications

  • Associates Degree in business administration, communications or related field
  • Three (3) years in previous administrative/office management position
  • One (1) year database management experience

Wage DOE. Benefits include vacation and sick leave, holidays and a 401K option.

To Apply email a resume and cover letter to Lindsay Anderson at

Lindsay@full-circlehr.com  with the subject line title “Application for Membership and Office Administrator.” A full job description is available upon request.

 

*North Olympic Salmon Coalition is an equal opportunity employer.

www.nosc.org

Feds seek expanded habitat protection as salmon, orcas battle climate change, habitat degradation – Seattle Times

While this is very welcome and overdue, it does, of course, exempt the military from this designation. So the Orcas can be protected against everything, except our military running secret experimental bombing, which by their own admission in their environmental review documents, will lead to death of wildlife. We consistently do not hold the military to the same environmental standards that we hold all other citizens.  Without doing that, this is just more of the same, fiddling while nature burns.

The designation requires review of federal actions within the areas that could affect southern resident killer whales, providing additional oversight by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/feds-seek-expanded-habitat-protection-as-salmon-orcas-battle-climate-change-habitat-degradation/?utm_source=referral&utm_medium=mobile-app&utm_campaign=ios

EVENT: State attorney general Ferguson, DNR commissioner Franz to speak Aug. 25 at Democrats’ annual Fish Feast

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, undefeated in 22 lawsuits so far against the Trump administration, will be one of two keynote speakers Sunday, Aug. 25, at the 25th annual Fish Feast in Port Townsend of the Jefferson County Democrats. Its theme this year: “There’s a Lot on the Line.”

Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz, who spearheaded the development of a 10-year statewide plan to fight and prevent wildfires, will be the other keynote speaker.

Tickets for the event at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds are available for $60 at jeffcodemocrats.com and by mail at Jefferson County Democrats, P. O. Box 85, Port Townsend, WA 98368. Tickets will also be available at the door (cash, check or card).

Doors open at 4 p.m. for the bar and socializing in the Erickson Building. Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m., and speakers begin at 6 p.m. The party donates one dollar of each ticket to the Jefferson County Fair Board.

“The Fish Feast is our major fundraiser of the year,” said party Chair Marty Gilmore. “Each ticket purchase supports the vital work we do year-round to elect Democrats! It’s also an opportunity to hear the latest on current issues from our guest speakers – and fun time to see friends.”

Recent successes by Ferguson’s office include the largest-ever trial award in a state consumer protection case, debt relief from predatory lending for hundreds of students, and defense of the constitution by defeating the Trump administration’s attempt to add a discriminatory citizenship question to the 2020 Census.

Franz’s office has led state efforts to make Washington’s lands resilient in the face of climate change, investing in carbon sequestration and clean energy with wind, solar and geothermal infrastructure. Her office has also allocated millions of dollars to struggling rural communities to spark economic opportunities.

Fish Feast attendees will also hear from U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, state Sen. Kevin Van de Wege, state Reps. Mike Chapman and Steve Tharinger, state party chair Tina Podlodowski, and local Democratic elected officials.

Before the feast is served, guests can mingle with candidates, campaigns, and organizations in Campaign Alley outside the Oscar Erickson Building.

Rep. Kilmer has sponsored tickets for 20 Young Democrats (under 35 years old). Contact Libby Wennstrom (360-301-9728) or Chelsea Pronovost (425-256-0626) to pre-register as a guest.

“We’re also offering 20 discounted tickets at our cost,” said Fish Feast organizer Claire Roney. “$25 each – first come, first serve.” For more information—or to volunteer for the Fish Feast, contact Roney at (360) 531-1177.

The Fish Feat menu will include sockeye salmon from Key City Fish, BBQed by chef Larry Dennison; shellfish from Taylor Shellfish; greens and veggies from local farms; rolls from Pane d’Amore; and cake. Beverages will include wine from the Wine Seller and beer from Port Townsend Brewing Co.

For more information about the Jefferson County Democrats, visit its website at jeffcodemocrats.com or its Facebook page, @jeffcodemocrats.

Public meeting set to discuss Duckabush River estuary restoration | Peninsula Daily News

This is great news. The old Hwy 101 bridge across this beautiful estuary is clearly at the end of it’s life. Being able to remove the highway as it is and re-engineer it’s approach and crossing can only be helpful to the estuary ecosystem. This is just south of where the Black Point development is going to go in (barring some miracle last minute issue, like an economic slowdown). The road there certainly could use widening, as well as a way for bicyclists to navigate it when traffic is heavy.

This is the kind of work that getting funds from the Federal government spreads the costs across a wide swath of the population, lowering the costs to all of us locally. In addition to this project, the causeway to Marrowstone Island is under re-engineering this summer and fall, allowing for the free flow of water between Scow Bay and Oak Bay again, for the first time in almost 100 years.

The bonus for the Duckabush re-engineering is that it should help the salmon returns to some degree. Fixing the Hood Canal Floating Bridge is going to make a huge difference as well, once they come up with an engineering solution to that problem.

Read the whole story at the PDN.

Fish and Wildlife officials to be in Brinnon on Saturday
— Read on www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/public-meeting-set-to-discuss-duckabush-river-estuary-restoration/

Kailin, Doyle honored with Eleanor Stopps environmental award – PDN

A 99 year old doctor from Sequim who was pivotal in stopping both a nuclear plant that was planned for the Miller Peninsula (just west of Cape George) as well as the planned Northern Tier pipeline that was planned to run through the waters off Protection Island, was honored with the Eleanor Stopps annual environmental award. Along with Dr. Eloise Kailin, young Sara Doyle was also a co-recipient, the first time the award was given to two people, and the youngest person to receive it. Doyle has been the Stewardship coordinator for the North Olympic Salmon Coalition. Eleanor Stopps was the woman who worked tirelessly for over a decade to turn Protection Island into a National Wildlife Refuge in 1982.

Read more on the story at the Peninsula Daily News

Kailin, Doyle honored with Eleanor Stopps environmental award

 

ZINKE ORDERS BROAD ROLLBACK OF WILDLIFE PROTECTIONS

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has announced a “commitment to defer” to state hunting and fishing practices on all lands within agency purview. His order is a stunning abdication of a more than century-old legal foundation of federal primacy for wildlife management on federal lands, according to Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER).

In a September 10, 2018 Memorandum to Heads of Bureaus and Offices, Zinke declared that henceforth states will be the “first-line authorities for fish and wildlife management” on all Interior lands and that Interior “hereby expresses its commitment to defer to the States in this regard.” To implement this reversal, Zinke directs Interior agencies compile any “regulations, policies, guidance that pertain to public recreational use and enjoyment of fish and wildlife…that are more restrictive than otherwise applicable State provisions” within 45 days. Within 90 days after that, each agency is supposed to recommend steps “to better align its regulations, policies, and guidance with State provisions.”

“This across-the-board abandonment of federal fish and wildlife safeguards is rooted in an ideological stance unsupported by any factual analysis,” stated PEER Executive Director Jeff Ruch, arguing that Zinke ignores the fact that many state game agencies are funded by hunting and fishing license fees and pursue practices, such as predator control, to maximize that revenue. “Federal parks, preserves, and refuges have a mission to protect biodiversity and should not be reduced to game farms.”

A sample of what Zinke’s memo could usher in is reflected by his controversial order that the National Park Service open its Alaska preserves to questionable hunting and trapping techniques, such as killing bear cubs and wolf pups in their dens, luring bears with bait, and shooting swimming caribou from a motorboat. Zinke’s order would put any federal wildlife protection not required by law on a path to repeal. This could mean federal parklands, refuges, and rangelands may have to accommodate states:

• Introducing non-native fish to natural lakes in a park or exotic pheasants for upland game bird hunting;

• Eliminating all wolves or other natural predator populations in a game management area; or

• Approving destructive or dangerous hunting techniques, such as trapping in hiking venues, hunting with dogs even on island refuges, hunting contests, and absence of bag limits.

Zinke’s memo posits the premise that “State governments have consistently demonstrated their commitment to sustaining fish and wildlife resources in perpetuity for the benefit of both current and future citizens.” This statement not only is demonstrably untrue but ignores the conditions leading to enactment of the federal Endangered Species Act.

“Mr. Zinke says that he does not want to give away ownership of federal lands but happily cedes their management,” added Ruch. “With his penchant for sweeping yet ill-considered actions, Ryan Zinke is on a trajectory to become the worst Secretary of the Interior since Teapot Dome.”

Acceleration of mountain glacier melt could impact Pacific NW water supplies – AGU 100 Earth and Space Science

This study should be a wake up call for our local politicians. We need to be contemplating how we are going to get water for this city when the mountains are unable to sustain us. It’s not too soon to have a plan and begin looking for funding sources as they become available.

The model showed that summer melt from some lower elevation glaciers is already declining, and summer melt from some higher elevation glaciers is expected to begin declining by 2050, according to the study.

https://blogs.agu.org/geospace/2018/08/16/acceleration-of-mountain-glacier-melt-could-impact-pacific-northwest-water-supplies/

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