How Coral Researchers Are Coping With the Death of Reefs – The Atlantic

While not specifically Olympic Peninsula News, many of us venture to places during our lives expecting to see coral. Whether you have gone to Hawaii, Belize, Mexico or any other beautiful tropical setting, the ability to snorkel the local reefs has been an experience that often creates environmental protection support. But there are warning signs everywhere. Anyone that has gone to a reef lately has seen the bleached coral and the lack of diversity of species. Even the scientists are getting depressed. Why post this? Because it is going to take all of us to eventually *demand* we take the radical steps needed to save the planet before it’s too late. By saving it, I mean that we are going to, at some point in the lives of people alive today, need to demand and take steps that will be extremely painful and life altering for every single person on this planet. That day is not far off. We have just lost Puerto Rico, drowned much of Houston, have seen three Category 4 storms land in the U.S. in one year, burned up much of the part of California that produces hundreds of millions of dollars of wine products, burned up huge amounts of Canadian western forests, and more. Our President that refuses to believe the trouble we are in seems simply incompetent rather than in the know. In fact, a concerted effort to destroy any scientific knowledge of the issue  is underway by his administration. This rivals the Nazi rewriting of German science in the 30s.  We are experiencing a similar situation to the German people then.  Some of us will flee. But the question all of us should be asking is, “what more can I do than I’m doing now?”

“The drumbeat of devastating news can take its toll on the mental health of people who have devoted their lives to coral.”

https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/11/coral-scientists-coping-reefs-mental-health/546440/

Elon Musk: ‘The Dumbest experiment In History’

“We are running the most dangerous experiment in history right now. Which is to see how much carbon dioxide the atmosphere can handle before there is an environmental catastrophe.” – Elon Musk

The most important thing you can listen to today.

More concerns raised about flame retardants – NY Times

The New York Times has a story that is quite disturbing, about new concerns with flame retardants, found in almost every home and office these days. It now looks like they could be the root cause of a cat wasting disease that has been rampant throughout the U.S. and the developed world. Our State Senator Kevin van de Wege has been a leader in trying to get these chemicals permanently banned in our state and with this article, perhaps he can finally convince remaining holdouts to get these chemicals banned from our homes.  PBDEs are found throughout Puget Sound waters. They likely are found in our fish. And they are found in our homes. Almost every couch seat cushion contains them. As does our electronics. You can help by letting Senator Van de Wege know you want to see him push to get this finalized next legislative session.

EVENT: Day of Science in Port Angeles – APRIL 22nd.

Science Celebration Flyer final

I am an Arctic researcher. Donald Trump is deleting my citations – Guardian

Very disturbing news about what is happening to our base of science from the incredibly malicious Trump Administration. We saw similar  wanton destruction of science to validate a political point of view from the Harper Administration in Canada about three years ago. We can only hope that they are simply deleting web pages and not the actual data, which, in case I have to remind anyone, is data that we, the taxpayers, paid for. It is not theirs to delete. Perhaps a lawsuit is in order?

Just over 1% of US Arctic waters have been surveyed to modern standards. In truth, some of the maps we use today haven’t been updated since the second world war. Navigating uncharted waters can prove difficult, but it comes with the territory of working in such a remote part of the world.

Over the past two months though, I’ve been navigating a different type of uncharted territory: the deleting of what little data we have by the Trump administration.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/mar/28/arctic-researcher-donald-trump-deleting-my-citations

P/T JOB OPENING: Program Assistant Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee

A part time position available for someone with program coordination.

mrc-program-assistant-descript_1-26-2017_page_1mrc-program-assistant-descript_1-26-2017_page_2

EPA declares fracking contaminates drinking water

This week, the EPA finally confirmed what we’ve known all along: fracking contaminates drinking water.

https://www.epa.gov/hfstudy

Feedback from:

http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/12/epas-final-fracking-report-re-writes-takeaways/

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/epa-report-fracking-hydraulic-fracturing-safety-risks/

https://psmag.com/dont-drink-the-water-93f4f1751554?gi=6c343acb4eb

http://www.wsj.com/articles/fracking-can-impact-drinking-water-epa-report-finds-1481652649

https://www.democracynow.org/2016/12/14/headlines/epa_final_study_concludes_fracking_does_contaminate_drinking_water

Last year, after a 5-year study on the impacts of fracking on drinking water, the EPA released a highly flawed draft report. The topline claimed that there were no “widespread, systemic” impacts on drinking water from fracking.

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