Event: Dana Lyons Concert Oct 9

A benefit for the Global Earth Repair Summit

Event: Forest Defense is Climate Defense – Port Townsend 9-17

Please join Center for Sustainable EconomyCenter for Responsible Forestry, and the Emergency Conservation Committee PNW on September 17th, 11:00 AM to 12:30 PM at the Port Townsend Community Center (right next to Farmers Market)  for a panel discussion on the climate impacts of industrial logging activities and what decision makers at the federal, state, and local level can do to scale up climate smart alternatives that represent a win-win-win for climate, communities, and workers. More information about the event can be found here. Please share the event on Facebook here. The panel will feature former Commissioner of Public Lands (2009-2017) Peter Goldmark, Dr. John Talberth, and Jessica Randall speaking about the scientific and economic case for protecting Olympic forests for their climate benefits and what strategies are in play to accomplish that goal. A lively discussion will follow, so please be prepared to share ideas on what you think needs to happen. See you then!

A farewell to Bob Campbell

From our friends at the Feiro Marine Life Center in PA. I agree, Bob was a wonderful human being. Sad to see him gone, though I haven’t seen him in a few years.

Please note that Feiro will be closed on Sunday, July 24 so that staff and volunteers will be able to attend Bob Campbell’s Celebration of Life.

He will be celebrated at 2:00pm at Studio Bob, 118 1/2 East Front Street, Port Angeles, with refreshments and socializing to follow.

Bob was a wonderful human with a deep passion for our ocean and a commitment to mentoring young humans. He was Feiro’s Facilities Director from 2003-2016. We miss him every day.

EVENT: Sierra Club Meeting – July 21

Meet Olympic Peninsula Environmental Champions Protecting Forests
Join Us in a Conversation on July 21, 7PM via Zoom, RSVP Required


Guest Speakers: Connie Gallant, President, and Patricia Jones, Executive Director, Olympic Forest Coalition (OFCO), and Tim McNulty, Vice President, Olympic Park AdvocatesOlympic Park Advocates is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit citizens conservation organization working to protect the beauty, integrity and biological diversity of Olympic National Park and the Olympic ecosystem.  OPA was founded in 1948 to defend the Park against attacks on its spectacular old-growth rain forest valleys. Seven decades later, it continues to work doggedly for increased protection for the Olympics.

The Olympic Forest Coalition (OFCO) promotes the protection, conservation and restoration of natural forest ecosystems and their processes on the Olympic Peninsula. This mission includes monitoring and caring for the rivers, streams and nearshore habitats of the Peninsula to ensure healthy populations of salmon and other wildlife, including threatened and declining species such as the Marbled Murrelet.  OFCO has been a major proponent of the Wild Olympics Campaign to increase protected wilderness on the Peninsula.

RSVP Here:   https://act.sierraclub.org/events/details?formcampaignid=7013q000002GME6AAO
Darlene Schanfalddarlenes@olympus.net

EVENT: Smokescreen: Debunking Wildfire Myths to Save Our Forests and Our Climate 

Sierra Club North Olympic Group’s June Presentation (Online only)
Dr. Chad T. Hanson Research Ecologist and Author Thursday, June 16, 7PM  

RSVP:  https://act.sierraclub.org/events/details?formcampaignid=7013q000002GriJAAS

Natural fires are as essential as sun and rain in fire-adapted forests, but as humans encroach on wild spaces, fear, arrogance, and greed have shaped the way that people view these regenerative events and have given rise to misinformation. The peril that these myths pose to forests is profound—affecting whole habitats and the wildlife that depend on them. The exploitation of these carbon dioxide-absorbing ecosystems also threatens humanity’s chance of overcoming the climate crisis. 

Dr. Chad Hanson will address these issues and suggest a better, science-based, and more hopeful path forward, as he discusses in his new book, 

Smokescreen: Debunking Wildfire Myths to Save Our Forests and Our Climate 

https://www.kentuckypress.com/9780813181073/smokescreen/

Dr. Hanson is a research ecologist and the director of the John Muir Project of Earth Island Institute, located in Big Bear City, California, and has a Ph.D. in ecology with a research focus on fire ecology in conifer forest ecosystems. He has published dozens of peer-reviewed studies on forest and fire ecology and is also the co-editor and co-author of the 2015 book, The Ecological Importance of Mixed-Severity Fires: Nature’s Phoenix.

Master Gardners Annual Plant Sale -Saturday!

Spring is in the air, and the Jefferson County Master Gardener Foundation is pleased to announce its annual plant sale will take place on Saturday, May 7.

It’s the first time the sale will be in person since 2019. During the height of COVID, the Foundation pivoted to an online sale format in 2020 and 2021. For this year’s sale on May 7, gardeners will be be able to reconnect in person with fellow plant enthusiasts while shopping the thousands of small trees, shrubs, perennials, annuals, ground covers, vegetables, fruits and succulents at the sale. 

The event will take place from 9 a.m.–2 p.m. on Saturday, May 7, at the Chimacum High School, 91 West Valley Road, Chimacum.

Shoppers may preview the plant and tree varieties on sale online: jcmgf.square.site/ All plants have been propagated by experienced Master Gardeners on a volunteer basis. Plants may vary in size from the photos shown on the site.

Please contact me if you have any questions.

Thank you!

Suzanne Eggleston

Jefferson County Master Gardener (Class of 2019)

Food Bank Growers Plant Sale

Please help out our local Food Bank Growers.


The Food Bank Growers network, a collection of 14 local garden teams dedicated to funneling fresh organic produce to four Jefferson County food banks, is holding its Second Annual Spring Plant Sale.

Orders will be taken online through Wed, April 27 at FoodBankGrowers.org. Items include vegetables, berries, herbs, and pollinating flowers, and also include Other Fun Items of bee homes, worm bins, bamboo stakes and weeding services! All proceeds will go toward helping feed your Jefferson County neighbors.

This year, all seed sales will be donated to World Central Kitchen, an organization that is feeding the people of Ukraine. The national flower of Ukraine is the sunflower; organizers of the sale are urging residents to show solidarity with Ukraine by planting a patch of sunflowers.

Order pick up will be on April 30th, from 10:00-1:00, at the Quimper Grange, 1219 Corona Ave at the end of Sheridan.

An in-person sale will occur from 1:00-3:00, with a worm bin demo and live music by Au Contraire. Come and tour a Food Bank Garden! For questions contact FoodBankGrowers@gmail.com.

Event: WA DOE air monitoring listening session on Jan 20th- Sign up now.

There is an upcoming listening session that the Washington State Department of Ecology is holding. As part of the recently passed “Climate Commitment Act,” Ecology is looking to promote environmental justice and equity. One way we are looking to do this is by expanding air quality monitoring in overburdened communities. There will be two steps in this process:

1)      Identifying a set of overburdened communities.

2)      Installing new air quality monitors in those communities.

Ecology will be holding a listening session to hear from communities on January 20th starting at 6 PM. More information regarding this listening session and a link to register can be found here:https://ecology.wa.gov/Blog/Posts/December-2021/Clearer-skies-ahead.

You can read up more about the Climate Commitment Act here (there is a short discussion on the environmental justice piece): https://ecology.wa.gov/Air-Climate/Climate-change/Reducing-greenhouse-gases/Climate-Commitment-Act.

Please forward along to anyone who may have interest.

Shingo Yamazaki

Washington State Department of Ecology

Solid Waste Management Program, Industrial Section

PO Box 47600

Olympia, Washington 98504

syam461@ECY.WA.GOV

Event: 2022 Environmental Lobby Day

WHEN: January 25th, 26th and 27th

WHERE: ONLINE

https://www.facebook.com/events/223059966492649/?active_tab=discussion

Join the 350 WA Network, Our Climate, Re-Sources, Climate Reality Project, Environmental Priorities Coalition and hundreds of activists to push for key environmental health and justice legislation in 2022. During lobby days, you will team up with other activists from your district to speak up for the environmental health and justice and gain the skills to be a persuasive constituent. You’ll have the opportunity to attend online issue briefings, learn how to lobby, hear from environmental champions, and meet virtually with your elected officials to advance important environmental legislation. Stay tuned for more details and pre-register here: https://us02web.zoom.us/…/tZItce…
Email kat@wcvoters.org with questions

EVENT: “We Are Puget Sound” Photo Exhibit at PTMSC

Washington Environmental Council is partnering with the Port Townsend Marine Science Center to bring this exhibit to the north Olympic Peninsula community. The We Are Puget Sound traveling photo exhibit will be on display at the Marine Science Center’s Flagship store in downtown Port Townsend from December 18, 2021 through February 2022.

The photo series explores people, places, and wildlife through extraordinary images, describes human connections in the past and present, and showcases community members engaged in remarkable efforts that benefit Puget Sound and all of us.  

The in-person photo exhibit will inspire and engage people on the Olympic Peninsula to join together and preserve this vital ecosystem and the livelihoods they support by focusing on one action each month from the campaign’s 10 Things You Can Do for Puget Sound.

The exhibit highlights 18 striking images from the book We Are Puget Sound: Discovering and Recovering the Salish Sea (Braided River, 2019). It also features work from  13 regional photographers showcasing individuals who are working to find meaningful solutions to protect the Puget Sound’s waters, wildlife, and the human health and economic prosperity this region supports.

EVENT: Science Panel to discuss Puget Sound Recovery issues Dec 16

If you are following the recovery efforts of the Puget Sound Partnership and care about what the next steps in the long running restoration of the Sound are going to be for 2022, this is likely one of the most important meetings of the year.


MEDIA CONTACT: Kevin Hyde, kevin.hyde@psp.wa.gov 

The Puget Sound Partnership Science Panel will meet on Thursday, December 16, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the December 16 Science Panel meeting will be a virtual Zoom meeting for all participants and the public.

Zoom instructions are included in the meeting agenda, which is available through our board meetings page: https://psp.wa.gov/board_meetings.php

Meeting highlights include:

  • A presentation for discussion about legislative and budget priorities for the 2022 Washington State legislative session. This session will include a presentation of the Partnership staff’s ranking of 2022 supplemental budget requests, Project Olga legislative recommendations, and input received from boards and advisory groups. Presentation by Don Gourlie, legislative policy director at the Puget Sound Partnership.
  • A presentation for discussion about the Washington State Academy of Sciences (WSAS) study on Net Ecological Gain. WSAS is advising the state legislature on a net ecological gain standard for state land use, development, and environmental laws to achieve a goal of better statewide performance on ecological health and endangered species recovery. Presentation by Ron Thom, member of the Washington State Academy of Sciences, staff scientist emeritus at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and senior science advisor for the Puget Sound Partnership. 
  • A presentation for discussion on cumulative effects evaluation and case study application to Puget Sound recovery. A cumulative effects evaluation is a tool to evaluate recovery progress and effectiveness by analyzing the cumulative benefits of recovery actions across large spatial and temporal scales. This presentation will include discussion of how the peer-reviewed methodology for a cumulative effects evaluation can be applied in Puget Sound. Presentation by Elene Trujillo, effectiveness monitoring analyst at the Puget Sound Partnership, Annelise Del Rio, monitoring performance analyst/salmon scientist at the Puget Sound Partnership, Ron Thom, staff scientist emeritus at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and senior science advisor for the Puget Sound Partnership, and Gary Johnson, retired research scientist, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.
  • A presentation and discussion about the Science Panel’s 2022 work plan and the shared priorities of the Partnership’s boards. This session will include discussion of existing topics and new topics for the Science Panel’s 2022 work plan and a review of the board’s 2021 priorities. Presentation by Jillian Reitz, boards policy advisor at the Puget Sound Partnership.
  • A presentation and discussion about identifying actions to include in the 2022-2026 Action Agenda. Partnership staff will update the Panel on the process to identify actions to include in the 2022-2026 Action Agenda update. Partnership staff will also invite the Panel to continue discussing its role in implementing this Action Agenda. Presentation by Dan Stonington, planning manager at the Puget Sound Partnership.
  • A presentation for discussion about the application of econometric cost models to fish passage barriers. This session will include an overview of a report on using econometric and machine learning methods to project the restoration costs for 27,000 barrier culverts documented in state inventories. Presentation by Braeden Van Deynze, postdoctoral research associate with the University of Washington’s School of Marine and Environmental Affairs, and Robby Fonner, economist at NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center. 


The full Science Panel agenda and meeting materials are available through our board meetings page at: https://psp.wa.gov/board_meetings.php.

If you need special accommodations to participate in this meeting, please notify Boards Policy Advisor Jillian Reitz at 360.742.2936.


About the Science Panel

The Science Panel’s expertise and advice are critical to the Puget Sound Partnership’s efforts to develop a comprehensive, science-based plan to restore Puget Sound. The members, appointed by the Leadership Council, are chosen from the top scientists in Washington State.

About the Puget Sound Partnership

The Puget Sound Partnership is the state agency formed to lead the region’s collective effort to restore and protect Puget Sound. Working with hundreds of government agencies, tribes, scientists, businesses, and nonprofits, the Partnership mobilizes partner action around a common agenda, advances Sound investments, and tracks progress to optimize recovery.

For more information, go to www.psp.wa.gov.

EVENT: Master Gardener Virtual Lecture Series

January 8th through February 12. Six Saturdays. 10AM to 12PM

Press Release
Contact: Suzanne Eggleston
Date: December 7, 2021
Event: Tickets on Sale for 2022 Yard & Garden Virtual Lecture Series
Tickets go on sale on December 7 for the Jefferson County Master Gardener Foundation’s 2022
Yard & Garden Virtual Lecture Series. The series will be conducted in a live webinar format, and
will run on six consecutive Saturdays from January 8–February 12, 2022.


The series will feature:
• Linda Gilkeson, best-selling author of Backyard Bounty: The Complete Guide to Year-Round
Organic Gardening in the Pacific Northwest, entomologist, private consultant, and instructor.
Linda’s lecture on January 8 will be “Planning Your 12-Month Garden.”
• Bess Bronstein, educator, ISA-certified arborist, and horticultural consultant with 35 years of
experience in arboriculture, landscape management and garden design. Bess’ lecture on
January 15 will be “How to Successfully Prune Any Shrub.”
• Eric Lee-Mäder, co-director of the Pollinator Program at the Xerces Society for invertebrate
conservation, and author of several books about bees, including Attracting Native Pollinators
and Farming with Beneficial Insects. Eric’s lecture on January 22 will be “Bring Back the
Pollinators: Sowing Biodiversity for Bees and Beneficial Insects.”
• Christina Pfeiffer, author of Pacific Northwest Month-By-Month Gardening: What to Do Each
Month to Have a Beautiful Garden All Year, and horticulturist with an emphasis on sustainable
and efficient techniques. Christina’s lecture on January 29 will be “What on Earth? Taking
Care of Garden Soils.”
• David Seabrook, a Jefferson County fire district commissioner, volunteer for the Department
of Emergency Management and the Food Systems Unit, Master Gardener, and climate
change activist. David’s lecture on February 5 will be “Growing Community Food System
Resilience for Uncertain Times.”
• James Cassidy, Oregon State University Soil Science instructor for more than 15 years, and
faculty advisor for the wildly popular OSU Organic Growers Club. James’ lecture on February
12 will be “Mulches and Crop Rotations.”
Each lecture will run from 10 a.m.– noon. Lectures will last approximately 90 minutes, and each
event will allow time for the audience to ask questions. The price for the entire six-lecture series
is $60. Single-event tickets are available for $12. Tickets may be purchased from
yardandgarden.brownpapertickets.com/
Ticket sales help support Jefferson County Master Gardener Program programs. For more
information, visit jcmgf.org

The event is cosponsored by Washington State University’s Jefferson County Extension
Service.

Climate on Tap: “What Happened in Glasgow?”

Wed, Dec 1st at Finn River

Join guest speakers Jessica Plumb (award winning filmmaker, “Return of the River”) and Rachel Cardone (international water issues researcher at Stanford) who attended COP26. They observed firsthand all the nations of the world convening in Glasgow, Scotland to agree on policies and plans to ensure for a sustainable future for this planet. Come hear the outcomes and plan what we can do to join in the good work.

Open to Climate on Tap only in the open air Pavilion with socially-distanced tables. Vaccinations and ID required. Food and beverages available including hot cider! Overhead heaters make it cozy!  Co-sponsored by Local 20/20 Climate Action, Jefferson County Public Health, and FinnRiver Cidery. This is not a lecture series, but a discussion format with a focus on action taking. For further information email Laura Tucker or call 360-379-4491.
Time: 7-8:30pm | LocationFinnRiver Cidery

TONIGHT: ALEXANDRA MORTON LIVE!

Please plan to join Protect the Peninsula’s Future (PPF) special guest speaker, Dr. Alexandra Morton, at our (virtual) annual meeting, Thursday November 18, 7 PM. Dr. Morton, will talk about her decades of research, struggles, setbacks and successes to save salmon, the key food for Northern Orcas.  

Dr. Morton moved to a remote archipelago on the BC coast in 1984 to study orca, but became an expert on the devastating impact of industrial aquaculture on wild British Columbia salmon populations.

Canadian government policy maintained salmon farms were harmless, which allowed fish viruses, bacteria and sea lice to flourish on the farms. Morton published science on the impact of sea lice and viruses, took the industry to court five times and never lost, and finally occupied several salmon farms over 280 days with local First Nation members. Today, 38 salmon farms are closed or scheduled to close and Morton is studying the impact of removing salmon farms on wild salmon, working closely with the First Nations of the BC Coast. She will describe how this happened, the damage by the industry and the work that lies ahead.

Join us and be ready with your questions. PPF formed as a 501c3 nonprofit in 1973 and is based on the North Olympic Peninsula of Washington State.

For Zoom info contact: Darlene Schanfald

Board Member Protect the Peninsula’s Future

PO Box 421Sequim WA  98382

protectpeninsulasfuture.orgdarlenes@olympus.net

Olympic Forest Coalition, WEC & Conservation NW argue case in WA Supreme Court today

This is the kind of lawsuit I find very useful. Status quo is not always legally correct, and challenging the notion that the only thing we can do with public forests is cut them for educational funding has never seemed correct. Our naive ancestors thought that what seemed like endless supplies of trees could fund education forever. We now know how simplistic that idea was. So we’ll find out if the court agrees. Big ramifications if they do. Everyone in this case are folks I’ve met and have a great deal of respect for their stances.


OFCO and colleague plaintiffs Washington Environment Council and Conservation Northwest, and individual plaintiffs Marcy Golde, Peter Bahls, et al, are before the Washington Supreme Court this Thursday, October 21st at approximately 10:00 AM in the “All the People” case. The lawsuit seeks to remove a barrier to balanced and ecological forest management by giving DNR the discretion to pursue timber harvest alongside other benefits. Timber production and associated revenue for beneficiaries, carbon management promoting climate stability, protections of clean water, species and habitats and against landslides and floods during extreme weather events, regrowth of older, complex forests for future generations, as well as non-timber forest products, cultural value, and recreation.

Our lawyer, Wyatt Golding from Chestnut Zioinzt, will argue the case for “All the People” of Washington (Conservation NW, et al. v. Commissioner of Public Lands et al., No. 99183-9). The case centers on the interpretation of the Washington Constitution and the federal land grant when we became a state. Article 16, Section 1 of the Washington State Constitution states that “all the public lands granted to the state are held in trust for “all the people”.


You may watch the hearing on state TVW.

See https://www.tvw.org/watch/?eventID=2021101173

EVENT: Shore Friendly Living workshop OCT 21

These folks put on good events and have been very successful in helping shoreline land owners properly manage their vegetation to protect the shores.


Effective management of vegetation on marine shorelines can make the difference in slowing erosion, reducing stormwater runoff, and improving nearshore habitat for salmon, forage fish, and Orcas.We invite you to join our free “Shore Friendly Living” virtual workshop series on Thursday, October 21st from 6:00-8:00pm to learn the benefits of using native vegetation for slope stability and habitat from Ben Alexander of Sound Native Plants. Some additional topics Ben will cover include: soil composition and drainage, removing invasive plant species, native plant selection, and planting techniques for bluffs and shoreline properties.Click below to register for the workshop. A link to the Zoom invitation will be sent following registration. 
Register now!
To learn more about Shore Friendly Living and how to be a good steward to these habitats we all value as residents of the Salish Sea, check out our website. You can also sign up for a free site visit with a coastal professional.
Website

North Olympic Sierra Club Meeting – Become a better recycler

The folks at the North Olympic Sierra Club are doing good things these days. Check out there next monthly meeting! And still virtual so you don’t have to leave home to participate!

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the average American household generates nearly 15 pounds of trash per day.  Even though most people try to recycle at least some of their trash, most of that waste winds up in landfills and incinerators.
BECOME A BETTER RECYCLERCome to the North Olympic Sierra Club’s October Meeting to Find Out How From Experts!
Laura Tucker, Jefferson County Public HealthMeggan Uecker, Port AngelesSolid Waste Superintendent
Thursday, October 21, 7PM  RSVP Required Click here to RSVP for the meeting.

Undersea Photographer’s show open in Port Townsend – PDN

Well worth seeing this show. Bill is an outstanding photographer.


…Bill Curtsinger, whom many know as co-owner of Sunrise Coffee, has witnessed many of the world’s strange and beautiful scenes. A National Geographic photographer for more than three decades before moving to Port Townsend, he created a body of work now sampled in the show simply titled “Curtsinger” at the downtown Grover Gallery, 236 Taylor St. Diane Urbani de la Paz reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Undersea photographer’s show open in Port Townsend

Judge hears lawsuit over fish farms: Skagit Valley Herald

The battle over fish farming in Puget Sound is not over yet.

Whether Cooke Aquaculture’s plan to raise native steelhead at fish farms in Puget Sound is a simple business transition or a complex threat to the marine ecosystem is being debated in King County Superior Court. Judge Johanna Bender heard testimony Thursday over Zoom in a lawsuit environment groups brought against the state Department of Fish & Wildlife for granting a permit to the seafood company to raise steelhead. The environment groups — Wild Fish Conservancy, Center for Biological Diversity, Center for Food Safety and Friends of the Earth — contend Fish & Wildlife did not meet the requirements of SEPA, the State Environmental Policy Act, before issuing a mitigated determination of non-significance for Cooke Aquaculture’s proposal to move into the production of steelhead following a state-mandated phase-out of non-native Atlantic salmon. The state Office of the Attorney General and Cooke Aquaculture disagree. Kimberly Cauvel report. (Skagit Valley Herald)

Judge hears lawsuit over fish farms

Puget Sound Days on the Hill -Puget Sound Partnership

We’d like to remind you to register by 1:59 p.m. Pacific Time tomorrow, Thursday, May 6, for the third of this year’s virtual Puget Sound Days on the Hill sessions, which will be held on Friday, May 7, from 1:00–2:00 p.m. Pacific Time, hosted by the Puget Sound Partnership and the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.

Please click here to register for the May 7 session. The confirmation email will provide the unique Zoom link for the session. 

At this session, we’ll discuss Puget Sound restoration and protection, salmon recovery efforts, climate change adaptation and mitigation, and infrastructure, among other topics, with Representative Dan Newhouse. We will also host a panel discussion, “What’s Happening in D.C.?,” with Morgan Wilson, director of Governor Inslee’s office in Washington, D.C., and Rich Innes of the Meridian Institute. Wilson and Innes will discuss the appropriations process and give an overview of potential upcoming legislation, such as the infrastructure package.

Representative Newhouse will speak for about 25 minutes, including a Q&A component, beginning at 1:30 p.m.

Advance registration is required.

We will send regular announcements with confirmed speakers for the week as well as a registration link for each event. You can also check https://www.psdoth.org for the latest information.


Week 3:

Friday, May 7, 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Pacific Time

With Representative Dan Newhouse and panelists Morgan Wilson (Governor Inslee) and Rich Innes 

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