Meet and Greet Sierra Club’s Endorsed Candidate for County Commissioner, Lorna Smith, July 14, 5PM

Sierra Club holds virtual meet and greet for Lorna Smith.

 

Lorna Smith has been an environmental activist since the late 1970s, and worked with prominent conservationists to establish a National Wildlife Refuge on Protection Island. She has made climate change one of her top priorities. She is a strong supporter of the County’s Comprehensive Plan and adopting a stronger Shoreline Management Program. She opposes plans to transport Canadian tar sands oil through our waters that will increase tanker traffic ten-fold and greatly increase the risk of oil spills. In her role as a planning commissioner, she has always put environmental considerations first and has opposed ill-conceived projects that negatively impacted communities and the environment. She has extensive experience building coalitions and seeking collaboration based on a lifetime of experience in government, NGO’s, and community groups, and through her extensive research on particular projects she has been able to convince decision makers to support her positions.  We believe this background and experience lends itself particularly well to this uniquely challenging period as we face the twin tasks of addressing disruptions caused by both the pandemic and climate change.

Meet Lorna on Zoom, Tuesday July 14 at 5PM

 

Join Zoom Meeting Link:

 

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81131568159

 

Meeting ID: 811 3156 8159

One tap mobile

+12532158782,,81131568159# US (Tacoma)

+16699006833,,81131568159# US (San Jose)

Septic Systems – Virtual Workshop THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2020 4-5PM

Agenda to include:  Basics of septic care and maintenance.

    Incentives to help pay for inspections.

                                Basic troubleshooting tips.

Get answers to your questions in a private chat room with Bob Suggs, Septic System Specialist

TO JOIN WORKSHOP:   HTTPS://zoom.us/j/92411814591

Everyone welcome and no need to RSVP.  Can’t participate…view the presentation online at “tpchd.org/om

Kids out of school…never too young (or old) to learn about this basic aspect of our environment and how to site it well and keep it functioning for many years!

Sponsor: Tacoma Pierce County Health Dept.

 

Tom Jay Walks On.

This came to me from Katherine Baril last week. It was written by a friend of Tom’s.


Tom Jay passed away in Jefferson hospital at 5:50 tonight in hospice care. High praises for the hospital, the staff, the care and the spirited compassion. Friends, who are tantamount to family were present.

Tom Jay was as close as our community could get to having our own “Watershed Shaman”  for the last 30 years.

Some knew Tom  from his nationally recognized art work, others from his poetry, more from the inspiration he gave us  with his words and the gift of reminding us we are all Salmon People. As our community grows and changes, and our ecosystems are destroyed and restored,  Tom was the holder of our flame, the hot, burning center reminding us that life was magic but short, that the job before us was big and heavy  and that the  metal of our spines needed constant strengthening and civic courage  before we would get too cold and brittle.

Some of us know Tom as the voice of Puget Sound clean up and restoration in the l980s.  It was Tom, in his  humble way that would speak to us quietly at first, paint images, and then cheer us on to invite us to  the magic and wonder of salmon.

We were each reminded of our own experience with  Tom. Some of us knew him in wet suits swimming upstream with salmon. Some worked with Tom to restore a  raise eggs in a small hatchery in  Discovery Bay under a unique agreement with State Fisheries to increase the run in one stream and then move eggs to Chimacum after a landslide that had destroyed that stream’s native runs. Tom would share  almost in a whisper. “you know that the eyes of salmon smolts would lock eyes with us and if you listen you hear them say,” give us a chance and we’ll come home,  our ancestors and elders will come home, lay eggs, and restore your streams”. Today, volunteers and students work with North Olympic Salmon to count those reds. Tom and the salmon taught us restoration is possible.

Tom also taught us, that we are all salmon people, bound together by the silver thread of returning salmon. Tom and Sara started the award winning Wild Olympic Salmon-  school children plant trees each fall, volunteers raise eggs and count redds. In November, each year, Tom and hte Wild Olympic Salmon volunteers would provided a  the clarion call with lights in dark tents to come home-  to celebrate, educate and restore. His gentle bringing together  of heavy  burnt metal and fire with little tiny fragile salmon eggs taught us that the crux of our challenge- the  privilege of being salmon people was to live in place long enough to understand our ecosystems and care enough to make a difference as if our life depended on it- Tom’s salmon are here as our teachers

Some of us will remember Tom always focusing on the salmon, telling us that as loggers, fisherman, environmentalists, young families  could work together, Many of the wonderful young leaders who are coming home after graduating from local high schools, planting trees when they were young, being raises on the annual Festival where salmon wore tails, candles lit trails to magic and music, and fall chum came home.

We, and our rivers and streams,  are all better because of Tom and Sara,  Tom’s voice is in the habitat trees that generations of students planted each winter. His voice is in the tree planting poetry of a generation of hippies that followed logging with new trees.   HIs spirit is in  the soil, the mychorizal network, the landscape, the knowledge that we share an extraordinary place and each of us as salmon people have the opportunity and the challenge to restore and preserve it. That community is about restoring ourselves as salmon people- diverse, generous, and needing a place to call home.

Tom will be  remembered in  his art, his poetry, his vision, his leadership, his belief in us. Tom called upon us to build and restore a community.  We who were lucky enough to know Tom had  a true friend.

Tonight I will go through the books, the poetry, the photos, the t-shirts from Tom and Wild Olympic Salmon.  I will remember Tom talking about the silver thread that salmon use to come home to us all. November will be the month chum return and Tom “walked into the forest”We can take long quiet fall walks and hear the returning chum.  We can reach out to gently touch Tom’s sacred bells in our watersheds.  I will remember Tom’s hands, his poetry, his quiet wisdom, his knowledge of the roots of words, his immense physical and moral  strength. Who else could pull together the vision, imagination, genius and funding to build a thirty foot bronze sculpture of a Native woman greeting Raven returning home to her in his canoe with a circle of  strong and fragile salmon swimming around them

I hate loosing you, my dearest friend, it came too soon- Its like you gave us everything you had, like the salmon, so we could swim again.

Thank you for teaching us so much, we will continue to walk the path.

A “WAKE / CELEBRATION” will take place at Finnriver in Chimacum in the afternoon on TUESDAY NOVEMBER 12

2 PM viewing of Tom in a special open casket
4 PM Wake and Celebration
PIE POTLUCK (sweet or savory)

Poems, sayings, expressions, stories, music welcome.

Bring tokens of love and blossoms to leave with Tom.

Poems, sayings, expressions, stories, music welcome.

Bring tokens of love and blossoms to leave with Tom.

Growing Blueberries Workshop – Wed September 18th

Growing Blueberries Workshop – Wed September 18th *New*

If you are interested in blueberry production, then this workshop is for you! Come on out and gain knowledge and practical experience with WSU specialists and local farmers! Workshop topics will include soil management and nutrient needs for optimal blueberry production, pruning for controlling bush size and concentrating ripening earlier in the season, pathogens  including phomopsis twig blight and mummy berry, weed management, and spotted wing drosophila and other pests. Guest speakers include Lisa DeVetter  Assistant Professor, Small Fruit Horticulture, Beverly Gerdeman – WSU Assistant Research Professor in Entomology and Janet Aubin  Farmer, Finnriver Farm. Janet will walk us through her 25 year old and 2 year old blueberry fields. Cost is $25 per person (*scholarship assistance available, please contact Kellie Henwood at least two weeks before the event or call (360) 379-5610 ext. 201. Preregistration required, click here.
Time: 9:00 a.m. – noon. Location: Finnriver Home Farm, 142 Barn Swallow Rd., Chimacum

WSU Master Gardener Training’ Course – Class starts September 16th

WSU Master Gardener Training’ Course – Class starts September 16th *New*

Interested in becoming a Master Gardener? The next WSU Master Gardener Training class starts soon!  This eleven-week course includes professional education from WSU educators via online training, lectures from local experts and field trips to outstanding local and regional gardens.  Upon completion, participants give back to the community by volunteering in one of our many programs, including our Growing Groceries class, WSU Seed Library, food bank gardens, native plant outreach, and Plant Clinics.  Lectures and field trips take place on Thursdays; September 12th through November 21st from 9:00 am to 3:00 pm.  The class is held at the Jefferson County Library and the WSU Classroom in Port Hadlock. .  Cost is $265.  For more details click here,  or contact Bridget Gregg.

EVENT: Beyond Waste Action Group 9/10

Beyond Waste Action Group – Local 20/20 – Tues  September 10th
The Beyond Waste Action Groupmeets the second Tuesday of each month at either 10:30 a.m.-12:00 or 7pm-8:30pm, depending on the month.  The group looks at a number of issues including food-waste composting, plastics reduction and recycling, reduction of garbage on an individual and community level, and various other waste-related topics that spontaneously come up during the meeting.  Newcomers are always welcome. Email Lisafor info on monthly agenda and meeting time and venue. Location: Uptown PT.
Time: 7:00 – 8:30 p.m. Location:  contact Lisa.

EVENT: State attorney general Ferguson, DNR commissioner Franz to speak Aug. 25 at Democrats’ annual Fish Feast

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, undefeated in 22 lawsuits so far against the Trump administration, will be one of two keynote speakers Sunday, Aug. 25, at the 25th annual Fish Feast in Port Townsend of the Jefferson County Democrats. Its theme this year: “There’s a Lot on the Line.”

Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz, who spearheaded the development of a 10-year statewide plan to fight and prevent wildfires, will be the other keynote speaker.

Tickets for the event at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds are available for $60 at jeffcodemocrats.com and by mail at Jefferson County Democrats, P. O. Box 85, Port Townsend, WA 98368. Tickets will also be available at the door (cash, check or card).

Doors open at 4 p.m. for the bar and socializing in the Erickson Building. Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m., and speakers begin at 6 p.m. The party donates one dollar of each ticket to the Jefferson County Fair Board.

“The Fish Feast is our major fundraiser of the year,” said party Chair Marty Gilmore. “Each ticket purchase supports the vital work we do year-round to elect Democrats! It’s also an opportunity to hear the latest on current issues from our guest speakers – and fun time to see friends.”

Recent successes by Ferguson’s office include the largest-ever trial award in a state consumer protection case, debt relief from predatory lending for hundreds of students, and defense of the constitution by defeating the Trump administration’s attempt to add a discriminatory citizenship question to the 2020 Census.

Franz’s office has led state efforts to make Washington’s lands resilient in the face of climate change, investing in carbon sequestration and clean energy with wind, solar and geothermal infrastructure. Her office has also allocated millions of dollars to struggling rural communities to spark economic opportunities.

Fish Feast attendees will also hear from U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, state Sen. Kevin Van de Wege, state Reps. Mike Chapman and Steve Tharinger, state party chair Tina Podlodowski, and local Democratic elected officials.

Before the feast is served, guests can mingle with candidates, campaigns, and organizations in Campaign Alley outside the Oscar Erickson Building.

Rep. Kilmer has sponsored tickets for 20 Young Democrats (under 35 years old). Contact Libby Wennstrom (360-301-9728) or Chelsea Pronovost (425-256-0626) to pre-register as a guest.

“We’re also offering 20 discounted tickets at our cost,” said Fish Feast organizer Claire Roney. “$25 each – first come, first serve.” For more information—or to volunteer for the Fish Feast, contact Roney at (360) 531-1177.

The Fish Feat menu will include sockeye salmon from Key City Fish, BBQed by chef Larry Dennison; shellfish from Taylor Shellfish; greens and veggies from local farms; rolls from Pane d’Amore; and cake. Beverages will include wine from the Wine Seller and beer from Port Townsend Brewing Co.

For more information about the Jefferson County Democrats, visit its website at jeffcodemocrats.com or its Facebook page, @jeffcodemocrats.

EVENT: Global Earth Repair Conference – PT May 3-5 Gofundme now

These folks are planning a conference in May. They are raising funds for it now. Please check it out.

https://earthrepair.friendsofthetrees.net/

EVENT: Movie – What Lies Upstream

Event Date:

Friday, December 7, 2018 – 7:00pm
Event Location:

Maier Performance Hall

Please join Peninsula College’s Magic of Cinema and the Sierra Club North Olympic Group on Friday, December 7th, at 7 p.m. in the Maier Performance Hall for a screening of What Lies Upstream.

In this documentary exposé, investigative filmmaker Cullen Hoback travels to West Virginia to study the unprecedented loss of clean water for over 300,000 Americans.

In January 2014 West Virginia citizens notice that their tap water has a peculiar smell. It is discovered that a mysterious chemical, MCHM, has leaked into the Elk River, poisoning the drinking-water supply for nearly half of West Virginia. Hoback arrives at the state’s capital during the heart of the crisis, his interest piqued by his family ties to the state and a desire to understand why this contamination happened. But getting to the bottom of this seemingly simple question is about to lead him down a rabbit hole of an unimaginable scale.

Initially all the blame seems to be directed at Freedom Industries, the company that spilled MCHM, the chemical that traveled downstream before entering the water intake. But locals reveal that Freedom Industries is only one small facility in the area they call “The Chemical Valley.” While it’s obvious that Freedom Industries plays a key role in this contamination, it is equally obvious that their chemical tanks were allowed to completely erode over time without proper government oversight or inspection.

As Hoback continues his investigation, he meets West Virginia Cabinet Secretary Randy Huffman, who serves as the head of the state’s Department of Environment Protection, which regulates all the industry in the state and handles all inspections. Huffman admits that Freedom Industries’ tanks hadn’t been inspected since 1993, but initially dismisses fears that MCHM is harmful. At the same time, Dr. Rahul Gupta, who runs the local health department, is the only official who seems concerned that the chemical might have negative long-term health effects. Yet, despite little scientific evidence, the CDC determines what amount of MCHM is safe for residents to drink.

Hoback continues to expand his study of drinking water in West Virginia to include outlying areas, where it quickly becomes clear that coal and chemical production have gone unchecked for decades. Virtually all the rivers and streams aren’t suitable drinking water sources.

Upon examination, he discovers a shocking failure of regulatory framework from both state and federal agencies and a wrecked political system. While he’s deep into his work in West Virginia, a similar water crisis strikes Flint, Michigan supporting the case that the entire system to protect drinking water in America is fundamentally broken.

The film also focuses on the 80,000 plus chemicals used in the US that enter our sewer streams, contaminate our water systems, and create runoff threatening our food and waters

The public knows very little about what chemicals are in the water supply and even less about the weak regulations and enforcement practices meant to protect it. Just because you don’t live in West Virginia or Flint doesn’t mean your water is safe.

This screening is free and open to the public. Following the film, there will be a speaker on WA State water pollution.

For more information contact Dr. Helen Lovejoy@ hlovejoy@pencol.edu.

 

EVENT:Lecture: Swimming Through Swirls at the PT Marine Science Center

Lecture: Swimming Through Swirls: Observing Ribbons and Rings of Ocean Circulation Autonomously

Location: Fort Worden Chapel
Date: October 14, 2018

Description

Sunday, October 14

3 pm

Dr. Charles Eriksen

Professor, School of Oceanography, University of Washington
The Fort Worden Chapel

Admission: $5

(students, teachers FREE)

Charlie Eriksen has helped change the way the ocean is observed, from top to bottom and shore to shore. His research group invented the Seaglider and Deepglider underwater vehicles. Scarcely six feet long, these autonomous vehicles swim thousands of miles while taking the pulse of ocean circulation: its temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, currents and biological properties. Eriksen deploys these robots to examine the undersea world of intense currents, where explosive turbulence and small subsurface waves interact with the global circulation. Together with students and colleagues, he has discovered new pathways for circulation in the far north, described the Gulf Stream and its deep relatives, and probed the structure of ubiquitous ocean eddies. Phytoplankton blooms revealed by these explorations feed the large mammals near Greenland and Iceland, and are keys to the up-and-down successes of major fisheries. Eriksen is Professor in the School of Oceanography at University of Washington and a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union.

More info: https://www.ocean.washington.edu/story/Deepgliders

https://www.ocean.washington.edu/story/Be_Boundless%252C_Oceanography

Contact:  eriksen@uw.edu

This is the first installment of The Future of Oceans lecture series.

This event is offered with generous support by the Darrow Family.

Assisted Listening Devices available

Shoreline Real Estate: Course for Real Estate Brokers

Coming up in October.

ShorelineRealEstate_WorkshopFlyer_Page_1

 

EVENT: Sierra Club Wastewater National Call In

Join Sierra Club’s Wastewater Residuals (formerly  Sewage Sludge)

Grassroots Team’s National Call

VICTORS Against Sewage Sludging

WEDNESDAY   APRIL 18   5 PM/PT   8 PM/ET

Call:    1-866 501 6174      Code: 1892005#

How did a small Eastern Washington State community of organic farmers defeat the application of sewage sludge in their farm land watershed?

 

Hear Mill Canyon resident Morton Alexander describe the Tolstoy Farm community and its fight against getting sludged.

Hear Attorney Rachael Osborn explain the legal issues involved.

 

morton alexander

Morton Alexander is a retired WA State employee and experienced community organizer.  He has lived in Mill Canyon for 46 years.  He is a neighbor to the Tolstoy Farm and maintains his own organic orchard.  His natural spring has been a source of clean drinking water for neighbors.    (Read more at   www.protectmillcanyonwatershed.org )   Photo credit: Colin Mulvany

 

Rachel Osborne

Rachael Paschal Osborn is a retired public interest water lawyer who lives on WA State’s Vashon Island.  She assisted the Mill Canyon farmers and orchardists in preventing the sludge permit.

 

March 2018 – Oil Spill Preparedness Month – Events in Clallam County

Clallam Marine Resources Committee just received the correct sign-in information from Department of Ecology. To participate in the webinar March 14th please use the link below. Sorry about the inconvenience.

Helle Andersen

Project Coordinator

Clallam MRC

March 14th Webinar “Staying Prepared in an Evolving World of Oil Movement” at 12 – 1 pm

More than 20 billion gallons of oil moves through Washington each year, carried by vessel, pipeline, road, and rail. You are invited to an online webinar to learn about the recent improvements and current challenges Washington state environmental regulators face to keep the state’s oil spill program strong. Learn about bulk oil movement in Washington, implementation of the 2015 Oil Transportation Safety Act, properties of oil and potential impacts from spills, existing response capability and opportunities for staying involved.

The webinar will be hosted by NWSC and Clallam MRC and presented by Dale Jensen, Program Manager and Linda Pilkey-Jarvis, Preparedness Manager, Department of Ecology Spills Program.

Join the webinar by clicking on this link: https://watech.webex.com/watech/j.php?MTID=m1586245d9d84d4a96259e47117c288da

Meeting password: spills18

Navy taking comment on draft plan for land, cold-water maritime training -PDN

More Navy needs for our lands and parks.

PORT TOWNSEND — The U.S. Navy is hosting an open house in Port Townsend tonight to provide information on its proposed special operations training in Western Washington.

The Naval Special Warfare Command proposes to conduct small-unit land and cold-water maritime training activities for naval special operations personnel.

…The open house is set for 5 to 8 tonight at Blue Heron School Commons, 3939 San Juan Ave., Port Townsend. It is the only open house planned on the North Olympic Peninsula.

I highly recommend you come out and let them know what you think of their proposals.

The whole story is here: https://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/navy-taking-comment-on-draft-plan-for-land-cold-water-maritime-training/

Support local newspapers and subscribe to the PDN and PT Leader.

 

EVENT: Feb 3 – Volunteers needed to plant native trees along Dungeness River

Volunteers needed to plant native trees along Dungeness River on Jamestown S’Klallam Tribal property

NOSC

Jim Pearson planting at the Salmon Creek planting held on January 6th and 7th.

The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe and the North Olympic Salmon Coalition seek volunteers to help plant native trees along the Dungeness River on February 3rd, 2017. The planting will be completed along one of the Dungeness River’s former floodplains.

In January 2016, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe purchased the property that will be planted, with funding from Puget Sound Acquisition and Restoration and Floodplains by Design. The restoration effort so far has involved removing three houses, including their septic and utilities, and revegetating the area in an attempt to restore it to its historic state of a floodplain. Floodplains are important as the take on excess water in times of flooding. Floodplains help to reduce the risk of damage when storms or snowmelt overwhelm the river banks. Floodplains also serve to provide cleaner water, habitat for fish and other wildlife, ground water recharge, and as flood storage. Reforestation of the floodplain along the Dungeness River will help to improve water quality and create healthy habitat for the fish and wildlife that frequent the area.

Tools and gloves will be provided, but are in limited supply so feel free to bring your own. The event will be from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m on February 3rd, and will include light refreshments and hot drinks. Bring warm, waterproof clothes and boots, water, and a lunch.

To receive directions, please RSVP to Katie at outreach@nosc.org or (360) 504-5611

About North Olympic Salmon Coalition:

The North Olympic Salmon Coalition is a non-regulatory non-profit organization that works with willing landowners and government agencies to perform salmon habitat restoration on the North Olympic Peninsula. Founded in 1990 by a group of dedicated community volunteers, the North Olympic Salmon Coalition was formed as one of fourteen Regional Fisheries Enhancement Groups in Washington State. Working in direct collaboration with Washington State, tribal governments and the communities of the Olympic Peninsula, we have spent the last 26 years restoring degraded and compromised habitat through both small and large-scale restoration projects. We utilize the efforts of our dedicated volunteers to increase the odds of salmon survival, foster community stewardship and promote the education of our youth. For more information or to volunteer, visit www.nosc.org or call 360-379-8051.

 

 

EVENT: Dec. 10 – Short of Breath: Marine Life in a Warming World

 

University of Washington School of Oceanography researcher Curtis Deutsch is Dec. 10 lecturer at Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s Future of Oceans Series
Short of Breath: Marine Life in a Warming World
PORT TOWNSEND, Wash. — Curtis Deutsch, Ph.D., and a University of Washington Associate Professor at the School of Oceanography, College of the Environment, will be the featured speaker in the third installment of the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s 2017-18 lecture series, “The Future of Oceans.”
Deutsch’s lecture, “Short of Breath: Marine Life in a Warming World,” will take place at The Commons at Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend, Wash., on Sunday, Dec. 10, at 3:00 p.m.
“Oxygen has been critical for the evolution and maintenance of animal life on Earth,” said Deutsch, who received an Investigator Award from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and is a Fellow of the Kavli Frontiers of Science. “Humans and other air breathers can take it for granted, but marine animals don’t have that luxury.”
Deutsch’s research models biological and environmental data to better understand the interactions between climate change and ecosystems. As natural cycles change over time, habitat is altered. This affects the way plants and animals function, potentially threatening their existence.
Deutsch has focused on the chemical makeup of ocean water and how it affects marine animals, plants and micro-organisms, including phytoplankton, the source of roughly 50 percent of the Earth’s oxygen. He also works with terrestrial ecologists to understand how climate influences the sensitivity of land plants and animals to the warming atmosphere.
“Ocean environments of low oxygen and poor habitability have waxed and waned throughout Earth’s history, and are poised to expand as humans warm the climate,” Deutsch said.
The PTMSC’s Future of Oceans lecture series, started in 2014, explores the frontiers of ocean research and emerging technologies while confronting the human capacity to understand and sustain healthy oceans. Each year hundreds of attendees are challenged and informed with thought-provoking presentations. To view the 2017-18 schedule of lectures, visit https://ptmsc.org/programs/learn/lecture-series.
For the latest information about the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, visit www.ptmsc.org  and www.facebook.com/PortTownsendMarineScienceCenter. Also, look for #PTMSC and #SalishSea or @PTMarineScience on Twitter and Instagram.
About the Port Townsend Marine Science Center 
Founded in 1982, the Port Townsend Marine Science Center is a non-profit 501c3 educational organization whose mission is to inspire conservation of the Salish Sea. Now in its 35th year, the Center provides place-based, people powered, hands-on learning for all ages including youth camps, exhibits of marine flora and fauna, educational and historical displays, citizen science programs and community-based lecture series. Located at Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend, Wash., the PTMSC offers two public exhibits: the Marine Exhibit and the Natural History Exhibit. For more information, including public hours, visit www.ptmsc.org.

Local legislators to host town halls on Peninsula in December – PDN

Upcoming events to allow you to communicate directly with our state and federal legislators. It would be a good idea to tell them how you feel about the proposed ban on net pen aquaculture, Navy jets, the new tax bill and other thoughts.

State Sen. Kevin Van De Wege, Rep. Steve Tharinger and Rep. Mike Chapman will host a town hall tour of the northern 24th District in December to listen to the ideas, concerns and comments of people before the start of the 2018 legislative session.

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/local-legislators-to-host-town-halls-on-peninsula-in-december/

CHIMACUM & LUDLOW CREEK BASINS PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE

Priority Basins Final Open House Flyer FinalPort Townsend – The Jefferson County Water Quality Department, in collaboration with the Jefferson County Conservation District, North Olympic Salmon Coalition and Jefferson Land Trust will be holding a public open house for Chimacum, Hadlock and Port Ludlow residents.  This event is scheduled Thursday, November 16th, 2017 at the Tri-Area Community Center (corner of Highway 19 & West Valley Road in Chimacum) at 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm.  Refreshments will be on hand and free water conservation gifts and information will be available for attendees.

The open house will feature information and Q&A with the staff from these agencies and organizations who will be on hand to provide updates on what’s been happening to protect water quality, salmon, habitat, and agriculture in Chimacum and Ludlow Creek. Highlights of the Open House will be:

·     Mike Dawson & Anna Bachmann of Jefferson County Water Quality and Glenn Gately of Jefferson County Conservation District will provide the findings on monitoring for bacteria pollution, implementing agricultural Best Management Practices and the status of septic systems in Chimacum & Ludlow Creek basins.

·       Latest information on salmon in Chimacum Creek from Sarah Doyle of the North Olympic Salmon Coalition.

·       Updates from Sarah Spaeth of the Land Trust on efforts to protect open space, habitat, and agriculture in the Chimacum basin.

·       Information on the USDA Rural Assistance Program and Craft3 programs providing financial resources for septic system repairs in this area.

This open house is part of a project, funded by the Washington State Department of Ecology, which conducted sanitary surveys and regular monitoring of Chimacum and Ludlow Creeks for bacterial pollution and other parameters affecting the health of people and the environment. Staff will be on hand to answer your questions at the open house.

For more information on the Open House on November 16th, contact 360-385-9444.

EVENT: The Future of Oceans Lecture Series 2017-2018 – NOV 12

Sharing the Sound – Salmon, Steelhead and Settlement
Jill Rolland, Sc.D.
Director of the USGS Western Fisheries Research Center
Fort Worden Chapel
For decades, scientists and concerned citizens have called for improving salmon spawning and rearing habitats in an attempt to reverse the trend of dwindling runs of salmon and steelhead in Puget Sound. To date, restoration has been critical in improving salmon smolt and juvenile steelhead survival. Unfortunately, these improvements have not been enough to produce the recovery that might have been expected. Increasingly, scientists are learning that other anthropogenic changes to the Puget Sound ecosystem, ranging from sky glow to ubiquitous pathogens, are likely having a greater impact on salmon and steelhead recovery than previously realized.

This is the second installment of The Future of Ocean lecture series. You can read more about the complete lecture series here.

This event is offered with generous support by the Darrow Family.
Admission: $5
Students, teachers FREE
Octopus and Donor Circle Members FREE
Visit website for information on Donor Circles

Assisted Listening Devices available

John Fabian wins Eleanor Stopps award for Hood Canal Coalition work – PDN

Retired astronaut turned activist John Fabian of Port Ludlow was awarded the Eleanor Stopps Environmental Leadership Award from the Port Townsend Marine Science Center for his efforts to protect Hood Canal. Fabian is the co-founder of the Hood Canal Coalition, a citizens group that rallied in 2002 to fight a proposal known by many as the “pit-to-pier project.” The proposed project from Thorndyke Resources was to build a 4-mile conveyor belt and 1,000-foot pier that would move gravel from the former Fred Hill Materials Shine pit to barges in Hood Canal. Cydney McFarland reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/john-fabian-wins-eleanor-stopps-award-for-hood-canal-coalition-work/

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