EVENT: State attorney general Ferguson, DNR commissioner Franz to speak Aug. 25 at Democrats’ annual Fish Feast

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, undefeated in 22 lawsuits so far against the Trump administration, will be one of two keynote speakers Sunday, Aug. 25, at the 25th annual Fish Feast in Port Townsend of the Jefferson County Democrats. Its theme this year: “There’s a Lot on the Line.”

Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz, who spearheaded the development of a 10-year statewide plan to fight and prevent wildfires, will be the other keynote speaker.

Tickets for the event at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds are available for $60 at jeffcodemocrats.com and by mail at Jefferson County Democrats, P. O. Box 85, Port Townsend, WA 98368. Tickets will also be available at the door (cash, check or card).

Doors open at 4 p.m. for the bar and socializing in the Erickson Building. Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m., and speakers begin at 6 p.m. The party donates one dollar of each ticket to the Jefferson County Fair Board.

“The Fish Feast is our major fundraiser of the year,” said party Chair Marty Gilmore. “Each ticket purchase supports the vital work we do year-round to elect Democrats! It’s also an opportunity to hear the latest on current issues from our guest speakers – and fun time to see friends.”

Recent successes by Ferguson’s office include the largest-ever trial award in a state consumer protection case, debt relief from predatory lending for hundreds of students, and defense of the constitution by defeating the Trump administration’s attempt to add a discriminatory citizenship question to the 2020 Census.

Franz’s office has led state efforts to make Washington’s lands resilient in the face of climate change, investing in carbon sequestration and clean energy with wind, solar and geothermal infrastructure. Her office has also allocated millions of dollars to struggling rural communities to spark economic opportunities.

Fish Feast attendees will also hear from U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, state Sen. Kevin Van de Wege, state Reps. Mike Chapman and Steve Tharinger, state party chair Tina Podlodowski, and local Democratic elected officials.

Before the feast is served, guests can mingle with candidates, campaigns, and organizations in Campaign Alley outside the Oscar Erickson Building.

Rep. Kilmer has sponsored tickets for 20 Young Democrats (under 35 years old). Contact Libby Wennstrom (360-301-9728) or Chelsea Pronovost (425-256-0626) to pre-register as a guest.

“We’re also offering 20 discounted tickets at our cost,” said Fish Feast organizer Claire Roney. “$25 each – first come, first serve.” For more information—or to volunteer for the Fish Feast, contact Roney at (360) 531-1177.

The Fish Feat menu will include sockeye salmon from Key City Fish, BBQed by chef Larry Dennison; shellfish from Taylor Shellfish; greens and veggies from local farms; rolls from Pane d’Amore; and cake. Beverages will include wine from the Wine Seller and beer from Port Townsend Brewing Co.

For more information about the Jefferson County Democrats, visit its website at jeffcodemocrats.com or its Facebook page, @jeffcodemocrats.

EVENT: Global Earth Repair Conference – PT May 3-5 Gofundme now

These folks are planning a conference in May. They are raising funds for it now. Please check it out.

https://earthrepair.friendsofthetrees.net/

EVENT: Movie – What Lies Upstream

Event Date:

Friday, December 7, 2018 – 7:00pm
Event Location:

Maier Performance Hall

Please join Peninsula College’s Magic of Cinema and the Sierra Club North Olympic Group on Friday, December 7th, at 7 p.m. in the Maier Performance Hall for a screening of What Lies Upstream.

In this documentary exposé, investigative filmmaker Cullen Hoback travels to West Virginia to study the unprecedented loss of clean water for over 300,000 Americans.

In January 2014 West Virginia citizens notice that their tap water has a peculiar smell. It is discovered that a mysterious chemical, MCHM, has leaked into the Elk River, poisoning the drinking-water supply for nearly half of West Virginia. Hoback arrives at the state’s capital during the heart of the crisis, his interest piqued by his family ties to the state and a desire to understand why this contamination happened. But getting to the bottom of this seemingly simple question is about to lead him down a rabbit hole of an unimaginable scale.

Initially all the blame seems to be directed at Freedom Industries, the company that spilled MCHM, the chemical that traveled downstream before entering the water intake. But locals reveal that Freedom Industries is only one small facility in the area they call “The Chemical Valley.” While it’s obvious that Freedom Industries plays a key role in this contamination, it is equally obvious that their chemical tanks were allowed to completely erode over time without proper government oversight or inspection.

As Hoback continues his investigation, he meets West Virginia Cabinet Secretary Randy Huffman, who serves as the head of the state’s Department of Environment Protection, which regulates all the industry in the state and handles all inspections. Huffman admits that Freedom Industries’ tanks hadn’t been inspected since 1993, but initially dismisses fears that MCHM is harmful. At the same time, Dr. Rahul Gupta, who runs the local health department, is the only official who seems concerned that the chemical might have negative long-term health effects. Yet, despite little scientific evidence, the CDC determines what amount of MCHM is safe for residents to drink.

Hoback continues to expand his study of drinking water in West Virginia to include outlying areas, where it quickly becomes clear that coal and chemical production have gone unchecked for decades. Virtually all the rivers and streams aren’t suitable drinking water sources.

Upon examination, he discovers a shocking failure of regulatory framework from both state and federal agencies and a wrecked political system. While he’s deep into his work in West Virginia, a similar water crisis strikes Flint, Michigan supporting the case that the entire system to protect drinking water in America is fundamentally broken.

The film also focuses on the 80,000 plus chemicals used in the US that enter our sewer streams, contaminate our water systems, and create runoff threatening our food and waters

The public knows very little about what chemicals are in the water supply and even less about the weak regulations and enforcement practices meant to protect it. Just because you don’t live in West Virginia or Flint doesn’t mean your water is safe.

This screening is free and open to the public. Following the film, there will be a speaker on WA State water pollution.

For more information contact Dr. Helen Lovejoy@ hlovejoy@pencol.edu.

 

EVENT:Lecture: Swimming Through Swirls at the PT Marine Science Center

Lecture: Swimming Through Swirls: Observing Ribbons and Rings of Ocean Circulation Autonomously

Location: Fort Worden Chapel
Date: October 14, 2018

Description

Sunday, October 14

3 pm

Dr. Charles Eriksen

Professor, School of Oceanography, University of Washington
The Fort Worden Chapel

Admission: $5

(students, teachers FREE)

Charlie Eriksen has helped change the way the ocean is observed, from top to bottom and shore to shore. His research group invented the Seaglider and Deepglider underwater vehicles. Scarcely six feet long, these autonomous vehicles swim thousands of miles while taking the pulse of ocean circulation: its temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, currents and biological properties. Eriksen deploys these robots to examine the undersea world of intense currents, where explosive turbulence and small subsurface waves interact with the global circulation. Together with students and colleagues, he has discovered new pathways for circulation in the far north, described the Gulf Stream and its deep relatives, and probed the structure of ubiquitous ocean eddies. Phytoplankton blooms revealed by these explorations feed the large mammals near Greenland and Iceland, and are keys to the up-and-down successes of major fisheries. Eriksen is Professor in the School of Oceanography at University of Washington and a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union.

More info: https://www.ocean.washington.edu/story/Deepgliders

https://www.ocean.washington.edu/story/Be_Boundless%252C_Oceanography

Contact:  eriksen@uw.edu

This is the first installment of The Future of Oceans lecture series.

This event is offered with generous support by the Darrow Family.

Assisted Listening Devices available

Shoreline Real Estate: Course for Real Estate Brokers

Coming up in October.

ShorelineRealEstate_WorkshopFlyer_Page_1

 

EVENT: Sierra Club Wastewater National Call In

Join Sierra Club’s Wastewater Residuals (formerly  Sewage Sludge)

Grassroots Team’s National Call

VICTORS Against Sewage Sludging

WEDNESDAY   APRIL 18   5 PM/PT   8 PM/ET

Call:    1-866 501 6174      Code: 1892005#

How did a small Eastern Washington State community of organic farmers defeat the application of sewage sludge in their farm land watershed?

 

Hear Mill Canyon resident Morton Alexander describe the Tolstoy Farm community and its fight against getting sludged.

Hear Attorney Rachael Osborn explain the legal issues involved.

 

morton alexander

Morton Alexander is a retired WA State employee and experienced community organizer.  He has lived in Mill Canyon for 46 years.  He is a neighbor to the Tolstoy Farm and maintains his own organic orchard.  His natural spring has been a source of clean drinking water for neighbors.    (Read more at   www.protectmillcanyonwatershed.org )   Photo credit: Colin Mulvany

 

Rachel Osborne

Rachael Paschal Osborn is a retired public interest water lawyer who lives on WA State’s Vashon Island.  She assisted the Mill Canyon farmers and orchardists in preventing the sludge permit.

 

March 2018 – Oil Spill Preparedness Month – Events in Clallam County

Clallam Marine Resources Committee just received the correct sign-in information from Department of Ecology. To participate in the webinar March 14th please use the link below. Sorry about the inconvenience.

Helle Andersen

Project Coordinator

Clallam MRC

March 14th Webinar “Staying Prepared in an Evolving World of Oil Movement” at 12 – 1 pm

More than 20 billion gallons of oil moves through Washington each year, carried by vessel, pipeline, road, and rail. You are invited to an online webinar to learn about the recent improvements and current challenges Washington state environmental regulators face to keep the state’s oil spill program strong. Learn about bulk oil movement in Washington, implementation of the 2015 Oil Transportation Safety Act, properties of oil and potential impacts from spills, existing response capability and opportunities for staying involved.

The webinar will be hosted by NWSC and Clallam MRC and presented by Dale Jensen, Program Manager and Linda Pilkey-Jarvis, Preparedness Manager, Department of Ecology Spills Program.

Join the webinar by clicking on this link: https://watech.webex.com/watech/j.php?MTID=m1586245d9d84d4a96259e47117c288da

Meeting password: spills18

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