EVENT: Dec. 10 – Short of Breath: Marine Life in a Warming World

 

University of Washington School of Oceanography researcher Curtis Deutsch is Dec. 10 lecturer at Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s Future of Oceans Series
Short of Breath: Marine Life in a Warming World
PORT TOWNSEND, Wash. — Curtis Deutsch, Ph.D., and a University of Washington Associate Professor at the School of Oceanography, College of the Environment, will be the featured speaker in the third installment of the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s 2017-18 lecture series, “The Future of Oceans.”
Deutsch’s lecture, “Short of Breath: Marine Life in a Warming World,” will take place at The Commons at Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend, Wash., on Sunday, Dec. 10, at 3:00 p.m.
“Oxygen has been critical for the evolution and maintenance of animal life on Earth,” said Deutsch, who received an Investigator Award from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, and is a Fellow of the Kavli Frontiers of Science. “Humans and other air breathers can take it for granted, but marine animals don’t have that luxury.”
Deutsch’s research models biological and environmental data to better understand the interactions between climate change and ecosystems. As natural cycles change over time, habitat is altered. This affects the way plants and animals function, potentially threatening their existence.
Deutsch has focused on the chemical makeup of ocean water and how it affects marine animals, plants and micro-organisms, including phytoplankton, the source of roughly 50 percent of the Earth’s oxygen. He also works with terrestrial ecologists to understand how climate influences the sensitivity of land plants and animals to the warming atmosphere.
“Ocean environments of low oxygen and poor habitability have waxed and waned throughout Earth’s history, and are poised to expand as humans warm the climate,” Deutsch said.
The PTMSC’s Future of Oceans lecture series, started in 2014, explores the frontiers of ocean research and emerging technologies while confronting the human capacity to understand and sustain healthy oceans. Each year hundreds of attendees are challenged and informed with thought-provoking presentations. To view the 2017-18 schedule of lectures, visit https://ptmsc.org/programs/learn/lecture-series.
For the latest information about the Port Townsend Marine Science Center, visit www.ptmsc.org  and www.facebook.com/PortTownsendMarineScienceCenter. Also, look for #PTMSC and #SalishSea or @PTMarineScience on Twitter and Instagram.
About the Port Townsend Marine Science Center 
Founded in 1982, the Port Townsend Marine Science Center is a non-profit 501c3 educational organization whose mission is to inspire conservation of the Salish Sea. Now in its 35th year, the Center provides place-based, people powered, hands-on learning for all ages including youth camps, exhibits of marine flora and fauna, educational and historical displays, citizen science programs and community-based lecture series. Located at Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend, Wash., the PTMSC offers two public exhibits: the Marine Exhibit and the Natural History Exhibit. For more information, including public hours, visit www.ptmsc.org.

Local legislators to host town halls on Peninsula in December – PDN

Upcoming events to allow you to communicate directly with our state and federal legislators. It would be a good idea to tell them how you feel about the proposed ban on net pen aquaculture, Navy jets, the new tax bill and other thoughts.

State Sen. Kevin Van De Wege, Rep. Steve Tharinger and Rep. Mike Chapman will host a town hall tour of the northern 24th District in December to listen to the ideas, concerns and comments of people before the start of the 2018 legislative session.

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/local-legislators-to-host-town-halls-on-peninsula-in-december/

CHIMACUM & LUDLOW CREEK BASINS PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE

Priority Basins Final Open House Flyer FinalPort Townsend – The Jefferson County Water Quality Department, in collaboration with the Jefferson County Conservation District, North Olympic Salmon Coalition and Jefferson Land Trust will be holding a public open house for Chimacum, Hadlock and Port Ludlow residents.  This event is scheduled Thursday, November 16th, 2017 at the Tri-Area Community Center (corner of Highway 19 & West Valley Road in Chimacum) at 5:30 pm to 7:30 pm.  Refreshments will be on hand and free water conservation gifts and information will be available for attendees.

The open house will feature information and Q&A with the staff from these agencies and organizations who will be on hand to provide updates on what’s been happening to protect water quality, salmon, habitat, and agriculture in Chimacum and Ludlow Creek. Highlights of the Open House will be:

·     Mike Dawson & Anna Bachmann of Jefferson County Water Quality and Glenn Gately of Jefferson County Conservation District will provide the findings on monitoring for bacteria pollution, implementing agricultural Best Management Practices and the status of septic systems in Chimacum & Ludlow Creek basins.

·       Latest information on salmon in Chimacum Creek from Sarah Doyle of the North Olympic Salmon Coalition.

·       Updates from Sarah Spaeth of the Land Trust on efforts to protect open space, habitat, and agriculture in the Chimacum basin.

·       Information on the USDA Rural Assistance Program and Craft3 programs providing financial resources for septic system repairs in this area.

This open house is part of a project, funded by the Washington State Department of Ecology, which conducted sanitary surveys and regular monitoring of Chimacum and Ludlow Creeks for bacterial pollution and other parameters affecting the health of people and the environment. Staff will be on hand to answer your questions at the open house.

For more information on the Open House on November 16th, contact 360-385-9444.

EVENT: The Future of Oceans Lecture Series 2017-2018 – NOV 12

Sharing the Sound – Salmon, Steelhead and Settlement
Jill Rolland, Sc.D.
Director of the USGS Western Fisheries Research Center
Fort Worden Chapel
For decades, scientists and concerned citizens have called for improving salmon spawning and rearing habitats in an attempt to reverse the trend of dwindling runs of salmon and steelhead in Puget Sound. To date, restoration has been critical in improving salmon smolt and juvenile steelhead survival. Unfortunately, these improvements have not been enough to produce the recovery that might have been expected. Increasingly, scientists are learning that other anthropogenic changes to the Puget Sound ecosystem, ranging from sky glow to ubiquitous pathogens, are likely having a greater impact on salmon and steelhead recovery than previously realized.

This is the second installment of The Future of Ocean lecture series. You can read more about the complete lecture series here.

This event is offered with generous support by the Darrow Family.
Admission: $5
Students, teachers FREE
Octopus and Donor Circle Members FREE
Visit website for information on Donor Circles

Assisted Listening Devices available

John Fabian wins Eleanor Stopps award for Hood Canal Coalition work – PDN

Retired astronaut turned activist John Fabian of Port Ludlow was awarded the Eleanor Stopps Environmental Leadership Award from the Port Townsend Marine Science Center for his efforts to protect Hood Canal. Fabian is the co-founder of the Hood Canal Coalition, a citizens group that rallied in 2002 to fight a proposal known by many as the “pit-to-pier project.” The proposed project from Thorndyke Resources was to build a 4-mile conveyor belt and 1,000-foot pier that would move gravel from the former Fred Hill Materials Shine pit to barges in Hood Canal. Cydney McFarland reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/john-fabian-wins-eleanor-stopps-award-for-hood-canal-coalition-work/

EVENT:The Man Who Built the Sierra Club: A Life of David Brower

Sierra Club Robert Wyss June 2017

EVENT: June 5th- New Giants of the Salish Sea

Worth attending!

Calambokidis_June5_2017

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