Weather or Not from Al Latham

Our monthly report from Al Latham here in Jefferson County. Always a fun and interesting read! 

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Greetings and happy La Nina spring from http://www.cocorahs.org station WA-JF-1 located 5.1 miles south of the Chimacum metropolis.

As Mark Twain said “In spring I have counted 136
kinds of weather inside of 24 hours”…   That pretty well describes the past March.

We recorded 2.42″ rain here with 3.8″ average.
For the water year so far we accumulated 23.84″ with 25.2″ being our average.

La Nina means cooler/wetter winter/spring.  It has
definitely been cooler around here but we haven’t experience more
rainfall – except for January of course, but that’s ancient history.

According to http://www.cliffmass.blogspot.com “Most of western Washington, Oregon, California, and the southwest states were more than 2F cooler than normal.   Chilling statistics”.
NOAA Climate Prediction Center is forecasting cooler
temps for the next 3 months but they are on the fence about weather it will be wetter, drier or normal rain wise.
So that’s it for now – enjoy whatever weather we get, but don’t put those tomatoes out too soon!  Al
 
“April’s air stirs in
Willow leaves…a butterfly
Floats and balances”         Basho
 
What do you call it when you get mugged on the vernal equinox?
The first robbin of spring!
 
When all the world appears to be in tumult, and
nature itself is feeling the assault of climate change, the seasons
retain their essential rhythm.
Yes, fall gives us a premonition of winter,
but the, winter, will be forced to relent,
once again
to the new beginnings of soft greens, longer light, and the sweet air of spring!      Madeline M. Kunin

Heck, Kilmer launch new caucus to support Puget Sound priorities

It’s gratifying to see that newly elected Derek Kilmer (who represents the Peninsula in the House), has stepped up and is attempting to take on the mantle of serious oversight on Puget Sound issues. Given the recent findings that sediment in the Central Sound has been getting more polluted rather than less, it’s time to aggressively change the game plan. Having met with Representative Kilmer at length not long ago, it was my impression that he is a ‘wonk’ very able to understand the complexities of issues. We will find out how much ability he has to deliver solutions, especially in a deeply divided and uncompromising House in WA DC.
Press Release from the Puget Sound Partnership
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Reps. Denny Heck and Derek Kilmer stepped up as Puget Sound protectors yesterday by announcing that they are co-founding the Congressional Puget Sound Recovery Caucus, devoted exclusively to promoting Puget Sound cleanup efforts. For the immediate future, the caucus work will focus on promoting the three recovery priorities, as identified in the Puget Sound Action Agenda: preventing pollution from urban stormwater runoff, protecting and restoring habitat, and restoring and re-opening shellfish beds. Reps. Jim McDermott, Adam Smith, Rick Larsen and Suzan DelBene have signed up as charter members. We appreciate the leadership and support these Members of Congress are providing for addressing the region’s highest priorities to restore and protect the Sound.
Kilmer’s news release: http://1.usa.gov/11iYDuhhttp://
Heck’s news release: http://1.usa.gov/1b18biehttp://

Snowpack for Olympics is great going into summer

The snowpack depth in the Olympic Peninsula as we head into summer is excellent. On May 1st, the last month until next November  that the snowpack is measured, showed that we were 103% of normal for  the year. This is still below last years snowpack but dramatically above the snowpack experienced in 2005, when the pack was only at 25% of normal. In 2006, the Makah Tribe ran very low on water supplies in their reservoirs  All measurements for the Cascades are also above normal. This is in contrast with drought conditions continuing across approx 60% of the country and especially  the southwest and central Rockies. Severe to execptionally severe drought (the highest level measured), continues to plague key farming areas from California to the Central Plains. Costs last year to farming were estimated to be between $50 and 200 B, which is higher than the estimated damage of Hurricane Sandy, according to the Center for Investigative Reporting

Given concerns about global warming, the understanding is that many areas will continue to experience wild weather swings,  storms with increased strength (as Oklahoma hurricanes  and Hurricane Sandy have shown recently, along with historic flooding in Texas) and prolongued drought. The drought of last year was epic, on a scale of the Dustbowl of the Great Depression. This year is expected to be close if not worse.

In the Northwest, we seem to be beneficiares of a pocket of ‘good’ weather. As global temperatures continure to rise, with little sign of a downturn in the trend (the trend is variable, as are most trends).

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