No flights, a four-day week and living off-grid: what climate scientists do at home to save the planet – The Guardian


I have talked to a number of people who wonder what they can do to help alleviate climate change, or prepare for it. Here’s a great article, with thoughts by a number of climate scientists on what they are doing. Can you cut down on the number of airplane flights a year? Switch diets? Maybe do just one of these.

 One of the best things you can do to address climate change is go down to a four-day working week. This would take some of the heat out of our ever-expanding economies, reduce our capacity and urge to consume, and create space to live a more balanced life.

I decided to retire from full time work a number of years ago, for many reasons, but one of them was to reduce  my carbon footprint. So far, it’s been a good, no, great choice. I only eat meat that has been small farm raised on grass and not grain, but there are numerous additional things I can do. A great idea for summer with your kids is to do a list of the various things that *could* be done to reduce your personal carbon footprint. i.e. is it really necessary to drive to a big box store to buy large bulk items? or paying a bit more to save the gas and pollution worth the trade off? How much do you actually save?

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2019/jun/29/no-flights-four-day-week-climate-scientists-home-save-planet?utm_source=pocket-newtab

While you are there reading this, donate a dollar or two to the finest newspaper on the planet, The Guardian.

 

One Response

  1. Sadly, WA part-time governor is to busy politicing to be concerned about the environmental damage he is doing. His support of the ethanol scam that has been foisted on the American consumers is especially tragic. I have yet to find any gasoline engine that doesn’t lose efficiency, up to as much as 10 percent when switched to 10 percent ethanol. Not only does this increase greenhouse gases by 10 percent directly, the indirect costs add another 10 percent. Additionally, utilizing corn for fuel instead of food has significantly increased food costs. Finally the thousands of acres of prairie land plowed up has runoff contributing to record flooding.

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