New study highlights the value of local knowledge in recovering endangered species – Pyys.org


As we move into the era of “Big Data”, one of the positive aspects to it is that we can start seriously incorporating a lot more of local up-to-date  knowledge into planning, and better understand trends and issues based on large data sets collected by the people on the ground themselves. This is good news folks. Here’s a concrete example of how it can work.

A new study (http://www.westcoast.fisheries.noaa.gov/publications/home_page_story_publications/marine_policy_article.pdf) highlights the value of local knowledge in recovering endangered species. The collaborative research, co-authored by NOAA Fisheries, the University of Washington, and researchers from the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, is specifically designed to incorporate the knowledge of recreational anglers into recovery planning for three rockfish species in Puget Sound—bocaccio, canary rockfish, and yelloweye rockfish, each of which was listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 2010. The study explores how recreational anglers’ understanding of the ecosystem and fishing practices influence their views of conserving Puget Sound rockfish. Through surveys of 443 recreational boat-based anglers, which included scoping questions related to their knowledge of rockfish biology, fishing practices, perceptions of threats to rockfish, and preferences for rockfish recovery measures, several key findings arose. (Pyys.org)

http://phys.org/news/2015-04-highlights-local-knowledge-recovering-endangered.html

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