Warnings on oysters – Multiple sources.

Oysters are considered an aphrodisiac, but what happens to them in hot weather isn’t so sexy. Warm air and water during summer make an ideal environment for a natural bacteria called vibrio parahaemolyticus to grow in oysters. Raw oysters, especially ones with the bacteria, can make people who eat them sick. Gina Cole reports.

Raw oysters risky during warmer months  http://www.goskagit.com/all_access/raw-oysters-risky-during-warmer-months/article_67523d12-e37a-11e2-bc29-0019bb2963f4.html

See also: Be vigilant about illness from tainted commercial shellfish, B.C. doctors told http://www.vancouversun.com/news/vigilant+about+illness+from+tainted+commercial+shellfish/8608330/story.html

Panel: Ocean acidification threatening sea life here – PDN

Acidification of the world’s oceans could have a profound effect on the North Olympic Peninsula, a panel of experts told Clallam County commissioners Monday. Caused by carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels, ocean acidification can destroy shells of crabs, clams, oysters and scores of creatures at the bottom of the food chain. The Strait of Juan de Fuca, Puget Sound and outer coast of Washington are particularly vulnerable because acidic water is upwelled off the coast every spring and summer.

Rob Ollikainen reports. Panel: Ocean acidification threatening sea life here at the PDN.

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20130416/NEWS/304169990/panel-ocean-acidification-threatening-sea-life-here

On Dabob Bay, man and nature nurture preservation – Seattle Times

Nice overview of the environmental story in Dabob Bay, reported by Ron Judd, with quotes from local environmental leader Peter Bahl, Chris Davis of the Nature Conservancy and Taylor Shellfish’s Bill Dewey.

I love Dabob Bay, it represents one of the few nearly pristine bays on the Salish Sea. (I disagree with Mr. Judd that it’s in “Puget Sound”, as most of us who have lived and sailed here for a long time, know that Hood Canal has always been considered a separate body of water from Puget Sound, as are the Straits. That’s why the naming of the Salish Sea was added). The bay is wonderfully quiet, and little of the houses can be seen from shore, giving the look of almost wilderness to it.

“Few places in the Northwest boast the odd mix of ingredients — man, mollusk, mammal and military — found in the deep mixing bowl that is Dabob Bay.”

Read the whole story at:
http://seattletimes.com/html/pacificnw/2019630870_pacificpdabob18.html

Combating Snails To Save Oysters – OPB.org

Imagine you’re an oyster laying snugly in your bed in Willapa Bay, filtering in nutrients while growing to two and a half inches in diameter. And then you feel a weight on your quarter-inch thick shell and a short time later you begin to hear a grinding sound. Slowly, inexorably over the next few hours the drilling continues as the radula (a sandpaper-like tongue) of an Atlantic or Asian oyster drill snail takes away debris that its secretions of hydrochloric acid has created on your shell. When the snail inevitably pokes through your shell, its proboscis makes you its next meal.

http://news.opb.org/article/combating_snails_to_save_oysters/

Evidence continues to point to Navy in Hood Canal Oyster Washup

Chris Dunagan continues to follow up on this bizarre situation. What’s new to me is that the Navy was apparently out there training for hours. This wasn’t just a ‘drive by’ incident, but apparently they were washing up huge wakes for a long time that day. Now it begins to make sense.

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Evidence continues to point toward the USS Port Royal as the cause of massive numbers of oysters washing up on beaches near Seabeck as well as along Dabob Bay on the opposite side of Hood Canal.

A Navy investigator visited affected residents on Misery Point yesterday, though it remains unclear when a report may be issued. According to folks along the beach, the investigator was able to smell the stench of rotting oysters still drifting about in that area.

I’m afraid there was some initial confusion about the timing, because some people discovered the washed-up oysters on Friday, Aug. 13, and I believe they assumed the event had occurred on Thursday, Aug. 12. Witnesses on both sides of Hood Canal have now confirmed that the Port Royal was speeding up and down Dabob Bay on Wednesday, Aug. 11.

Read more: http://pugetsoundblogs.com/waterways/2010/08/27/hood-canal-residents-still-troubled-by-oyster-washup/#ixzz0xxzQcb8q

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