Video: Blue Carbon- A Story from the Snohomish Estuary

What is the Green New Deal in action? Here’s a 5 minute overview of the work and reasons behind restoring the Snohomish Estuary, which could be considered an element of the New Green deal today.. An extremely clear story of why we need to restore salt water estuaries both for carbon sequestration, protection against storm surge, and much more. A fun watch! Especially share it with pre-teens and teens!

 

Policy pivot: A new emphasis on restoration to protect Puget Sound – UW

Interesting research by the UW. It’s nothing that we didn’t already instinctively know, but it’s always good to be able to point to research when facing legislators asking about methodology and costs.

But protecting Puget Sound is not just about recovering certain species of fish. As the region continues to grow, it is also about protecting the livelihoods and diverse cultures of the people who live there, and balancing their needs with the needs of the natural world.

The second half of their study looks at an example of a restoration project that involved various social groups and produced multiple benefits — a potential model for future restoration in Puget Sound. A similar approach has been used for the Nisqually Delta restoration project along Interstate 5 northeast of Olympia, as well as for the Ebey Slough restoration adjacent to I-5 near Marysville.

https://www.washington.edu/news/2018/08/21/policy-pivot-a-new-emphasis-on-restoration-to-protect-puget-sound/

 

Shoreline restoration project at Fort Townsend nears completion – PDN

Not mentioned in the article is the fact that there will be better beach access for boaters, including a camping site for kayakers. Brought to you by the efforts of the Northwest Straits and your local Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee.

Shoreline restoration providing easier access to a beach at Fort Townsend and habitat for shorebirds, forage fish and other marine animals is nearly complete. The $400,000 project, managed by the Northwest Straits Foundation, includes removing about 1,700 cubic yards of large rock and soil, which are being moved out by barge. The remaining small landing will be reshaped. “The purpose of this project first and foremost was to uncover habitat that had been buried by the fill pad,” said Lisa Kaufman, project manager for the Northwest Straits Foundation. “Also equally important was to improve public access.” Jesse Major reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/shoreline-restoration-project-at-fort-townsend-nears-completion/

Pope Resources, Port Gamble S’Klallam negotiating conservation easement – North Kitsap Herald

More good news and work towards a restoration of our waters.

The Port Gamble S’Klallam Tribe is in line to receive a $1.5 million grant from the state Department of Fish and Wildlife’s Estuary and Salmon Restoration Program, or ESRP. According to Fish and Wildlife, the Tribe would use the grant and other funds “to protect the mill site from future development with a conservation easement … for the purpose of restoration, returning the site to a more natural state for future generations.” The site is across Port Gamble Bay from Point Julia and the Port Gamble S’Klallam reservation, where the S’Klallam people relocated after the mill was established in 1853. The Tribe and Pope Resources are working together “to develop a vision for the future of the site that includes restoration, a park setting and recognition of Tribal history,” according to Fish and Wildlife. Richard Walker reports. (North Kitsap Herald)

http://www.northkitsapherald.com/news/366496231.html

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