EVENT: State attorney general Ferguson, DNR commissioner Franz to speak Aug. 25 at Democrats’ annual Fish Feast

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, undefeated in 22 lawsuits so far against the Trump administration, will be one of two keynote speakers Sunday, Aug. 25, at the 25th annual Fish Feast in Port Townsend of the Jefferson County Democrats. Its theme this year: “There’s a Lot on the Line.”

Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz, who spearheaded the development of a 10-year statewide plan to fight and prevent wildfires, will be the other keynote speaker.

Tickets for the event at the Jefferson County Fairgrounds are available for $60 at jeffcodemocrats.com and by mail at Jefferson County Democrats, P. O. Box 85, Port Townsend, WA 98368. Tickets will also be available at the door (cash, check or card).

Doors open at 4 p.m. for the bar and socializing in the Erickson Building. Dinner starts at 5:30 p.m., and speakers begin at 6 p.m. The party donates one dollar of each ticket to the Jefferson County Fair Board.

“The Fish Feast is our major fundraiser of the year,” said party Chair Marty Gilmore. “Each ticket purchase supports the vital work we do year-round to elect Democrats! It’s also an opportunity to hear the latest on current issues from our guest speakers – and fun time to see friends.”

Recent successes by Ferguson’s office include the largest-ever trial award in a state consumer protection case, debt relief from predatory lending for hundreds of students, and defense of the constitution by defeating the Trump administration’s attempt to add a discriminatory citizenship question to the 2020 Census.

Franz’s office has led state efforts to make Washington’s lands resilient in the face of climate change, investing in carbon sequestration and clean energy with wind, solar and geothermal infrastructure. Her office has also allocated millions of dollars to struggling rural communities to spark economic opportunities.

Fish Feast attendees will also hear from U.S. Rep. Derek Kilmer, state Sen. Kevin Van de Wege, state Reps. Mike Chapman and Steve Tharinger, state party chair Tina Podlodowski, and local Democratic elected officials.

Before the feast is served, guests can mingle with candidates, campaigns, and organizations in Campaign Alley outside the Oscar Erickson Building.

Rep. Kilmer has sponsored tickets for 20 Young Democrats (under 35 years old). Contact Libby Wennstrom (360-301-9728) or Chelsea Pronovost (425-256-0626) to pre-register as a guest.

“We’re also offering 20 discounted tickets at our cost,” said Fish Feast organizer Claire Roney. “$25 each – first come, first serve.” For more information—or to volunteer for the Fish Feast, contact Roney at (360) 531-1177.

The Fish Feat menu will include sockeye salmon from Key City Fish, BBQed by chef Larry Dennison; shellfish from Taylor Shellfish; greens and veggies from local farms; rolls from Pane d’Amore; and cake. Beverages will include wine from the Wine Seller and beer from Port Townsend Brewing Co.

For more information about the Jefferson County Democrats, visit its website at jeffcodemocrats.com or its Facebook page, @jeffcodemocrats.

Tidal forests offer hope for salmon – Puget Sound Institute

Wonderful short article that highlights a goal we can (and actually are in many places) work towards, which is estuary restoration. Small fish hang out in these places. There are just these kind of places on the Dungeness and other rivers here on the Peninsula. Not so much on the Elwha. Give it a read.

https://www.eopugetsound.org/magazine/is/tidal-forests

 

Vicki Christiansen to stay on as head of Forest Service – High Country News

Seems like a reasonable choice.

Vicki Christiansen is set to become the permanent chief of the U.S. Forest Service, after seven months as the interim head. She replaced former Forest Service Chief Tony Tooke, who resigned amidst sexual harassment allegations in March.

https://www.hcn.org/articles/u-s-forest-service-vicki-christiansen-to-stay-on-as-head-of-forest-service?utm_source=wcn1&utm_medium=email

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Washington carbon policy should invest in landscapes, rural communities, state lands chief says – Washington DNR & Seattle Times

DNR Commissioner steps into the fray on climate change and carbon offsets.

Hilary Franz, the state commissioner of public lands, has stepped to the center of the carbon debate in Washington, calling for a strategy that invests in forests, agricultural and aquatic lands, and rural communities as a way to fight climate change.

“My duty is to ensure that our lands and waters remain healthy and productive – supporting Washingtonians not just today, but far into the future,” said Commissioner Hilary Franz. “Climate change not only threatens our ecosystems, it threatens the productivity of the lands that sustain so many communities, from farmers to loggers to shellfish harvesters.If we are to keep our lands healthy and productive, we must reduce carbon pollution.”
In order to meet the challenge of climate change head-on, Commissioner Franz outlined Four Resilience Principles of a smart carbon reduction policy:
  1. Tackle the root cause – carbon pollution – and invest in reduction efforts
  2. Strengthen the health and resilience of our lands, waters, and communities
  3. Accelerate carbon sequestration
  4. Invest in and incentivize solutions with multiple benefits
These principles are intended to guide and inform our state’s debate on carbon policy, yielding solutions that prioritize investments in the health and productivity of our lands and waters, such as funding marine restoration and incentives to keep working farms from being converted to other uses.

Hillary Franz Stance on Climate Change

https://www.dnr.wa.gov/news/climate

 

 

Forest battle continues over defining the upper bounds of fish habitat- Watching our Waterways

Another good piece of reporting by Chris Dunagan.

A long-running battle over how to manage potential fish habitat on commercial forestland could be coming to a head — although it isn’t clear if the solution will satisfy either forestland owners or environmentalists. To be clear, there is not much argument about streamside buffers where salmon, trout and other fish are readily found, thanks to state and federal rules stemming from the landmark Forests and Fish Report. Buffers are designed to save trees that serve the needs of fish — including insects for food, shade for cool water and eventually down trees that form pools for resting as well as hiding places and spawning areas. Chris Dunagan reports. (Watching Our Water Ways)

http://pugetsoundblogs.com/waterways/2017/07/22/forest-battle-continues-over-defining-the-upper-bounds-of-fish-habitat/

Lands commissioner fields barrage of questions during Port Angeles gathering – PDN

Glad to hear that Ms. Franz is out and circulating in the rural areas, getting feedback on her department’s plans. While this meeting may have been more talk than action, there needs to be talk first before action. We have far too much action without talk going on Washington D.C. these days. It seems that she prefers to listen, talk  and then make decisions.

The state Department of Natural Resources’ newest leader visited Port Angeles last week to unveil her agency’s newest initiative: a competitive technical staff assistance program to help rural communities develop their DNR assets. What recently elected state Lands Commissioner Hilary Franz received Thursday at a Clallam County Courthouse meeting packed with about 80 participants was an earful on topics ranging from unpredictable timber revenues to developing scuba-diving recreation opportunities. Paul Gottlieb reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/news/lands-commissioner-fields-barrage-of-questions-during-port-angeles-gathering/

 

Climate change, rural growth are priorities for new Washington lands commissioner – Seattle Times

The state’s newly elected lands commissioner says her top priorities will be to find ways to strengthen local rural economies and to prepare state lands and communities to deal with climate change. Hilary Franz, an environmental attorney who beat out retired Navy commander Steve McLaughlin, will take over the helm at the Department of Natural Resources (DNR) in January from two-term commissioner Peter Goldmark. Phuong Le reports. (Associated Press)

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/climate-change-rural-growth-are-priorities-for-new-washington-lands-commissioner/

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