Interesting industry overview of pipelines.

This web site has an interesting industry biased take on the pipeline status in North America. Often to get to the facts you have to monitor sites like this.  If you have been intrigued by the issues being raised both in Canada and the fight over the Keystone XL and now the Standing Rock uprising, you might want to view this gas analyst web site for the ‘big picture’.  Just be clear the author  sees no future banning gas and oil pipelines, but acknowledges the current problems that the industry is facing with protests, leaks and gas shortages. I also am doubtful that the American public, once they realize that our current Congress is not going to help create a ‘bridge to tomorrow’ by  supporting subsidies to get off fossil fuel, won’t rebel and demand even more pipelines. These pipelines carry the fuel to heat homes to much of the Middle West, Southwest, Southeast and East coast. If you think that we are going to stop building more pipelines in the near future, it’s time for you to get out in the field and think about how the US will actually get off natural gas without frightening the public. Currently we seem to live by crisis management, and in the last few years (see Zika funding) Congress can’t even do that.

The writer also  doesn’t mention the shortage British Columbia faced this summer due to the forest fires in Alberta.

Today I want to talk about the other reason you don’t want your pipeline in the news. Over the past week gasoline prices have spiked across the Southeast as a result of a leak in one of the nation’s most important pipelines. But before I get to that, I want to first provide a high-level overview of the U.S. oil and gas pipeline network.

The Energy Newsletter

http://e.invdly.com/index.php?action=social&c=378556588ac6e7c339ad16abffe8348a.78400

 

State regulators recommend costs of closing Colstrip 1 and 2 be included in rate case – Seattle PI

We all want to see a move to an oil and coal free future. Here’s an article calling out the costs. If you are in favor of the move, you will need to pay more. But in the long run, this will force people to either move to tidal or solar/wind on their homes, or in community electricity farms, and continue the move to more energy efficiency. We are facing a very uncertain future, and it’s the cost of getting there.

State utility regulators issued an investigation report Monday recommending Puget Sound Energy include the costs of closing its two older coal-fired electric generating plants in Colstrip, Mont. in the company’s next rate case. Colstrip plume 2_1The staff of the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission found that, based on information provided by PSE, current rates aren’t enough to recover the costs of retiring the plant and conducting environmental remediation. PSE has estimated that costs of closure for Colstrip 1 and 2 will range from about $65 to $100 million. The costs are expected to increase the longer the plants continue to operate. Including these costs in a rate case will allow commission staff and interested parties to evaluate the estimates and make recommendations to the commission in order to mitigate the impact on PSE’s ratepayers, the commission said. The company is required to file a general rate case by April 1. Rita Robison reports. (SeattlePI.Com)

http://blog.seattlepi.com/boomerconsumer/2016/02/01/state-regulators-recommend-costs-of-closing-colstrip-1-and-2-be-included-in-rate-case/

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