B.C. announces $4M in rebates for home and work EV charging stations – CBC

Can we get this here? Might do the job of a carbon tax in moving people to EVs.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/b-c-announces-4m-in-rebates-for-home-and-work-ev-charging-stations-1.5298750

To qualify for new rebates, documentation must be submitted by March 31, 2020

The province has announced $4 million in rebate incentives through CleanBC for home and work installations of electric vehicle charging stations.

At a news conference in Vancouver on Thursday, Michelle Mungall, the minister of energy, mines and petroleum resources, and George Heyman, the minister of environment and climate change strategy, said the new EV infrastructure incentives are part of an effort to make the switch from gas to electric vehicles more affordable and accessible for B.C. residents.

Elon Musk: ‘The Dumbest experiment In History’

“We are running the most dangerous experiment in history right now. Which is to see how much carbon dioxide the atmosphere can handle before there is an environmental catastrophe.” – Elon Musk

The most important thing you can listen to today.

Britain could see its first full day without coal – Seattle Times

LONDON (AP) — Britain’s National Grid says Friday may be the first full 24-hour work-day since the Industrial Revolution in which the nation doesn’t depend on electricity generated from coal.

http://www.seattletimes.com/business/britain-could-see-its-first-full-day-without-coal/

EPA declares fracking contaminates drinking water

This week, the EPA finally confirmed what we’ve known all along: fracking contaminates drinking water.

https://www.epa.gov/hfstudy

Feedback from:

http://arstechnica.com/science/2016/12/epas-final-fracking-report-re-writes-takeaways/

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/epa-report-fracking-hydraulic-fracturing-safety-risks/

https://psmag.com/dont-drink-the-water-93f4f1751554?gi=6c343acb4eb

http://www.wsj.com/articles/fracking-can-impact-drinking-water-epa-report-finds-1481652649

https://www.democracynow.org/2016/12/14/headlines/epa_final_study_concludes_fracking_does_contaminate_drinking_water

Last year, after a 5-year study on the impacts of fracking on drinking water, the EPA released a highly flawed draft report. The topline claimed that there were no “widespread, systemic” impacts on drinking water from fracking.

Canada approves controversial Kinder Morgan oil pipeline – The Guardian

Well, Trudeau split the baby. The Northern Tier Gateway project, which would have gone through the  rain forest and imperiled the northern coast of B.C. will not be built. However, the Kinder Morgan pipeline to shipping facilities in Vancouver will. This raises the stakes for oil spills dramatically in the Straits. Trudeau did put millions of new dollars into updating the oil spill response network, which had been decimated by 12 years of Steven Harper’s do nothing government. While environmentalists are furious about this decision, we need to weigh the fact that the Strait already has one of the best vessel management systems in the world, and we work very cooperatively with Canada. With a much larger Canadian presence (the U.S. has had to bring the lion’s share of funding up to now) I feel we can be somewhat assured that it’s less likely than it could be to get a major spill. But this bitumen oil is far worse to clean up. With all the terrible environmental news in the U.S. from the election, we’ll just have to take this as a best of the worse case scenarios. We are going to have our hands full fighting the Trump administration’s policies, or lack of them.  We knew that Canada wasn’t going to leave it’s oil in the ground, as much as we would like them to, and the pipelines are marginally better than rail.

Canada has approved Kinder Morgan Inc’s hotly contested plan to twin a pipeline from the Alberta oil sands to the Pacific coast, setting up a battle with environmentalists who helped elect the prime minister, Justin Trudeau.

The Liberal government, seeking to balance demands from both greens and the energy industry, said allowing Kinder Morgan to build a second pipeline next to its existing Trans Mountain line will help ensure oil exports reach Asia and reduce reliance on the US market.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/nov/29/canada-approves-kinder-morgan-oil-pipeline-justin-trudeau

Interesting industry overview of pipelines.

This web site has an interesting industry biased take on the pipeline status in North America. Often to get to the facts you have to monitor sites like this.  If you have been intrigued by the issues being raised both in Canada and the fight over the Keystone XL and now the Standing Rock uprising, you might want to view this gas analyst web site for the ‘big picture’.  Just be clear the author  sees no future banning gas and oil pipelines, but acknowledges the current problems that the industry is facing with protests, leaks and gas shortages. I also am doubtful that the American public, once they realize that our current Congress is not going to help create a ‘bridge to tomorrow’ by  supporting subsidies to get off fossil fuel, won’t rebel and demand even more pipelines. These pipelines carry the fuel to heat homes to much of the Middle West, Southwest, Southeast and East coast. If you think that we are going to stop building more pipelines in the near future, it’s time for you to get out in the field and think about how the US will actually get off natural gas without frightening the public. Currently we seem to live by crisis management, and in the last few years (see Zika funding) Congress can’t even do that.

The writer also  doesn’t mention the shortage British Columbia faced this summer due to the forest fires in Alberta.

Today I want to talk about the other reason you don’t want your pipeline in the news. Over the past week gasoline prices have spiked across the Southeast as a result of a leak in one of the nation’s most important pipelines. But before I get to that, I want to first provide a high-level overview of the U.S. oil and gas pipeline network.

The Energy Newsletter

http://e.invdly.com/index.php?action=social&c=378556588ac6e7c339ad16abffe8348a.78400

 

State regulators recommend costs of closing Colstrip 1 and 2 be included in rate case – Seattle PI

We all want to see a move to an oil and coal free future. Here’s an article calling out the costs. If you are in favor of the move, you will need to pay more. But in the long run, this will force people to either move to tidal or solar/wind on their homes, or in community electricity farms, and continue the move to more energy efficiency. We are facing a very uncertain future, and it’s the cost of getting there.

State utility regulators issued an investigation report Monday recommending Puget Sound Energy include the costs of closing its two older coal-fired electric generating plants in Colstrip, Mont. in the company’s next rate case. Colstrip plume 2_1The staff of the Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission found that, based on information provided by PSE, current rates aren’t enough to recover the costs of retiring the plant and conducting environmental remediation. PSE has estimated that costs of closure for Colstrip 1 and 2 will range from about $65 to $100 million. The costs are expected to increase the longer the plants continue to operate. Including these costs in a rate case will allow commission staff and interested parties to evaluate the estimates and make recommendations to the commission in order to mitigate the impact on PSE’s ratepayers, the commission said. The company is required to file a general rate case by April 1. Rita Robison reports. (SeattlePI.Com)

http://blog.seattlepi.com/boomerconsumer/2016/02/01/state-regulators-recommend-costs-of-closing-colstrip-1-and-2-be-included-in-rate-case/

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