Kuterra aquaculture by ‘Namgis First Nation raises hope for wild salmon— and some hackles – National Observer

An update on the attempt to create a financially viable closed-containment aquaculture in BC. Ramifications for the Olympic Peninsula because of the push to bring open water net pens to the Straits and expand use in the Sound continues.

The ’Namgis First Nation, with advice and support from a large number of groups, including Tides Canada, conservation groups, and funding agencies, has launched Kuterra, a land-based, “closed-containment” aquaculture project that keeps their Atlantic salmon out of contact with the larger marine ecosystem.

http://www.nationalobserver.com/2015/07/23/news/kuterra-aquaculture-%E2%80%98namgis-first-nation-raises-hope-wild-salmon%E2%80%94-and-some-hackles

Sport fishing ban in place over parts of South Coast due to drought – CBC

Bringing global warming home to B.C…

The province is suspending sport fishing in streams and rivers throughout most of the South Coast of B.C. due to warming water temperatures and low river and stream levels. The move follows a similar ban on Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands where recreational angling was suspended earlier this month. The ban on South Coast fishing takes effect July 22 to September 30. Fishing is banned in most rivers and streams in regions south of Toba Inlet in the north to the U.S. border in the south. (CBC)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/sport-fishing-ban-in-place-over-parts-of-south-coast-due-to-drought-1.3160846

Puget Sound steelhead management input sought – The Olympian

If you are involved in fishing and interested in salmon management, here’s an opportunity for you to volunteer your input.

The public’s input is being on sought on the selection of at least three Puget Sound rivers where hatchery steelhead would not be released. The wild steelhead management zones would be an additional effort by the state Department of Fish and Wildlife to conserve wild fish.

http://www.theolympian.com/outdoors/article27159301.html

State money to fix salmon blocking culverts falls far short – Seattle Times

Our legislators have again short changed legally mandated environmental funding. This one is for a critical but largely unseen problem that affects salmon spawning habitat, culverts. We likely will be fixing this through the end of the century, if global warming hasn’t wiped them out of the range.

A federal judge has told the state that it must find a way to come up with $2.4 billion to repair culverts that are barriers to migrating salmon.

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/state-money-to-fix-salmon-blocking-culverts-falls-far-short/

Strong pink salmon run expected in 2015, as well as chinook in the ocean and Columbia River – Olympian

Good news for Chinook, less so for Coho.

The state Department of Fish and Wildlife Monday in Olympia released the forecasts for salmon runs in Puget Sound, Pacific Ocean and Columbia River.… Slightly more than 900,000 fall chinook are expected to return to the Columbia River this year. That would be the third largest run on record since 1938, said Ron Roler, Columbia River policy coordinator. The ocean abundance of Columbia River coho this year is expected to be nearly 777,000 fish, down from 964,000 last year. Jeffrey P. Mayor reports. (Olympian)

http://www.theolympian.com/2015/03/02/3603215_state-salmon-forecst-meeting-underway.html

Puget Sound salmon face more ups and downs in river flows – Phys.org

Good news and concerning news from some recent science.

Many salmon rivers around Puget Sound have experienced increasing fluctuations in flow over the past 60 years, just as climate change projections predict – and that’s unfortunate news for threatened Chinook salmon, according to a new analysis of salmon survival and river flow. More pronounced fluctuations in flow can scour away salmon eggs and exhaust young fish, especially when lower flows force adult fish to lay eggs in more exposed areas in the center of the channel. The new study published in the peer-reviewed journal Global Change Biology says such increased flow variability has the most negative effect on salmon populations of several climate factors considered. (Phys.org)

http://phys.org/news/2015-02-puget-salmon-ups-downs-river.html

Chinook salmon could be wiped out by 2100, new study claims -CBC

Whether or not this research is correct, the general trend does not look good for Chinook. On the Dungeness River, for example, even with 25 years of recovery work, they are not seeing Chinook return as expected. In Canada, the huge growth of Vancouver, the vast clear-cutting and mining going on in spawning streams coupled with a lack of any enforcement in protecting those streams and rivers  seems to be a precursor to the kind of destruction of habitat as Western Washington witnessed a few decades ago.

New climate-change research involving a University of British Columbia scientist predicts that one of the West Coast’s most prized salmon stocks could be wiped out over the next 85 years. A study has concluded that there is a five per cent chance of a catastrophic loss of the chinook salmon by 2075, and a 98 per cent chance the population will suffer catastrophic losses by 2100, if climate change warms the water. An international research team looked at the ability by the chinook to adapt to warming water temperatures caused by climate change. (Canadian Press)

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/chinook-salmon-could-be-wiped-out-by-2100-new-study-claims-1.2881635

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