Port Angeles Begins Work on Landfill Nearshore Restoration

Received from Anne Schaeffer of the Coastal Watershed Institute:

On Tuesday, 12 August 2014, Jamie Michel, CWI nearshore biologist and Kathryn Neal, City of Port Angeles, updated NOAA, DFW, and DNR management on key priorities for the Elwha nearshore and the City of Port Angeles. The city, after literally a decade of urging by the local citizens, local and regional scientists and managers, has taken the first step to solve the problem of the City of Port Angeles landfill.

If done well part of this solution will optimize upcoming sediment delivery from Elwha dam removals, reverse 100 years of sediment starvation, and protect/restore critical nearshore of the feeder bluffs of the Elwha nearshore.

CWI continues to lead this dialog and is dedicated to collaboratively realizing solutions that benefit the community and the Elwha nearshore-and the national resources it supports. It’s been a surprisingly challenging effort to get these world class nearshore management issues and restoration opportunities onto the action radar of a few of our state and federal management agencies. Thankfully WDFW, DNR, DoE, the CoE, and EPA are helping. And with leadership from Sissi Bruch, Dan McKeen, and Craig Fulton we are now making headway.

 

Pictures and details on our blog:http://www.coastalwatershedinstitute.org/blog/.

 

Anne Shaffer

Coastal Watershed Institute

P.O.Box 2263

Port Angeles, Washington 98362

anne.shaffer@coastalwatershedinstitute.org

360.461.0799

www.coastalwatershedinstitute.org

 

Peninsula marine life centers losing sea stars to mysterious disease – PDN

Visitors to the North Olympic Peninsula’s two major marine science centers are likely to see few sea stars. Sea star wasting disease, which has decimated wild populations, also is tearing through captive collections. The disease has accelerated this summer, said staff members at both the Feiro Marine Life Center in Port Angeles and the Port Townsend Marine Life Center. Arwyn Rice reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

Read the rest of the story at the Peninsula Daily News. Subscribe and support local journalism.

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20140728/NEWS/307289990/peninsula-marine-life-centers-losing-sea-stars-to-mysterious-disease

Oak Street property eyed for marine science, conference center in Port Angeles – PDN

Looks like the Feiro might be expanding and moving. Good news!

… The 1.96-acre waterfront site — a former log yard — could be the new home for the Feiro Marine Life Center and a 5,800-square-foot shared conference center, said Deborah Moriarty, director of the center now housed in a city-owned building on City Pier. Paul Gottlieb and Arwyn Rice report.

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20140109/NEWS/301099983/oak-street-property-eyed-for-marine-science-conference-center-in

Job Opening – Feiro Marine Life Center in PA

Here’s a great way to start the year.  A new job!

Position Open – Education and Volunteer Director 

Feiro Marine Life Center is a public, non-profit marine education facility located on the Port Angeles City Pier. The facility houses a hands-on marine exhibit with local near shore species, a classroom and an equipped laboratory. Feiro Marine Life Center has over 20,000 visitors annually and provides programs for over 3,000 school students. Feiro is growing both in programs and in size and is planning to build a new facility over the next few years.

Visit http://www.feiromarinelifecenter.org to learn more about the organization.

Position Available: Education and Volunteer Director

Description: Feiro Marine Life Center is looking for a full-time Education and Volunteer Director to lead marine science education programs and coordinate the volunteer program at a small, but growing, marine life center. The individual would work with numerous community partners in program development and implementation. The applicant would also work with interns and/or volunteers to assist with teaching and to provide training to enhance programs. Programs are generally focused on marine and ocean life, but may include additional components including underwater remotely operated vehicles, solar and wind or stormwater education.

Required background or experience: Extensive professional experience planning, implementing and delivering educational programs, preferably some of which is in non-traditional settings (i.e. outside of the classroom). A degree in marine biology or demonstrated equivalent experience or expertise and experience building and maintaining partnerships is essential.

Preferred background: Familiarity in state learning standards and relevant national standards. Experience managing volunteers and/or volunteer docents. Experience with web work, social media, and grant writing. Must be outgoing, organized and able to work independently, and as a part of a team.

Salary: $35,000-$40,000 DOE

To Apply: 

Please send resume and cover letter (including two references) to:

Deborah Moriarty

Feiro Marine Life Center

PO Box 625

Port Angeles, WA

98362

Deadline for applications: January 15, 2014

Or electronically to deborahm@feiromarinelifecenter.org

Earth Economics – A new way of valuing ecosystems

David Batker of Earth Economics

David Batker of Earth Economics presents their analysis of Clallam County ecosystems.

The Quarterly meeting of the Strait Environmental Recovery Network (ERN) met on Friday in Port Angeles. The ERN is chartered by the Puget Sound Partnership to get organizations together to prioritize work on recovery projects along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. This month, we had David Batker, chief economist and Executive Director, of Earth Economics report on their work done for Clallam County. EE created a report called “Policy Implications of the Economic Benefits of Feeder Bluffs and 12 other Ecosystems” as part of the SMP. Sound boring? Think again…

EE has formed some new models to help understand the economic benefits of these ecosystems and their recovery. This is really revolutionary analysis. Constantly, opposition to environmental programs  rail about how fixing the environment is “too expensive” and “costs jobs”. This analysis turns that on it’s head. It makes it very hard to argue that it isn’t the *right thing* to fix the environment, from a purely economic perspective.

EE has done work around the world, and this is really ground breaking stuff. You can find more about them at http://www.eartheconomics.org.

The entire talk can be downloaded or listened to at:

Climate Change Events Scheduled for OCT. 10-11

Olympic Climate Action is joining with Peninsula College and the Elwha Klallam Heritage Center to offer three free programs on climate change in October.

October 10
Jon Riedel (speaker) “Vanishing Ice: What Happens to the Olympic Peninsula Water Supply as Glaciers Retreat?”
12:30pm to 1:30pm, Peninsula College Little Theater (Studium Generale series)

Check out these and more at the blog:
http://olyclimate.org/events/

Mystery solved: Kelp off Elwha River mouth a rare spring variety found in late summer – Peninsula Daily News

A mystery kelp found during a survey of Clallam County offshore sea life has been positively identified as a regionally native but rare growth known as Laminaria ephemera…. Read the rest of the story at the PDN link below.
Arwyn Rice reports.
http://www.peninsuladailynews.com/article/20130923/news/309239979/mystery-solved-kelp-off-elwha-river-mouth-a-rare-spring-variety

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