Navy defends electronic warfare training project in Pacific Beach public meeting – PDN

Related news on the Navy’s expansion of electronic warfare testing.

The town with the most direct impact from the Navy’s proposal to expand electronic warfare training in Olympic National Forest had its first public meeting on the plan this week. More than 175 residents of Pacific Beach in Grays Harbor County attended the Wednesday night meeting, with many voicing opposition. A five-person team from the Navy — the U.S. Forest Service declined an invitation to attend — defended the military agency’s finding in August that the project would have no significant environmental impact. Angelo Bruscas reports. (North Coast News)

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20141121/NEWS/311219979/navy-defends-electronic-warfare-training-project-in-pacific-beach

$1.12 million rain garden project in Port Angeles nears completion – PDN

New raingardens are being implemented in PA and here in PT. WSU  will be doing some talking about them today, actually.

A $1.12 million stormwater project in west Port Angeles to relieve flooding and improve stormwater runoff water quality is nearly complete. The city has installed rain gardens at eight intersections on South H, K, L and M streets, as well as a new, larger drain pipe system to relieve flood problems on South H Street. Rain gardens are designed to transfer surface stormwater to groundwater by providing planted “wells” for water to pool and soak into the ground, rather than entering the stormwater system, and to provide a natural filter for surface stormwater. Arwyn Rice reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20141120/NEWS/311209986/-112-million-rain-garden-project-in-port-angeles-nears-completion

And in Port Townsend:

Catching the Rain: Rain Gardens 101

Thurs. Nov. 20, 5-6 pm

WSU Extension Office, 380 Jefferson St, Port Townsend

Stormwater from landscapes and roadways is the number one contributor of pollutants to Puget Sound.  Bob Simmons, Water Resources Specialist with WSU Extension, is presenting a free 1-hour seminar on the basics of rain gardens–how rain gardens help improve water quality, what rain gardens are and how they work, and the four steps to creating and sustaining a rain garden.  The newest “how to” manual from WSU will be also available (or you can download it from www.raingarden.wsu.edu).  Attending this workshop provides an introduction to the Nov. 24-25th installation events, but is not required to participate in those events.

 

Please RSVP to Sally Chapin, WSU Extension (360-379-5610 x 200 or wsujeffersoncounty@gmail.com.).

Rain Garden Planting

Mon, Nov. 24, 1 – 4 pm

Tues Nov. 25, 9 am – 12 noon

Garfield St., Port Townsend

Learn by doing, whether you are new to rain gardens or already a pro.  Join WSU Extension, Jefferson County Marine Resources Committee and the City of Port Townsend as we install two new rain gardens on Garfield Street.  WSU experts Erica Guttman and Bob Simmons will provide instruction and answer all your questions as we plant two new rain gardens to treat stormwater before it flows into Port Townsend Bay. Bring your own digging tools, gloves, etc. More details when you register.

 

Please RSVP to Sally Chapin, WSU Extension (360-379-5610 x 200 or wsujeffersoncounty@gmail.com.).  Let her know which workday(s) you prefer.

Washington state budget outlook predicts shortfall – Tacoma News Tribune

This has been the elephant in the room, for trying to get anything new done at the State. It shows that our economy is far from ‘back to normal’ as the revenues are still far below needs.  From what I’ve heard, our legislators don’t want to hear any asks for anything outside the current needs. It seems that someone, sometime is going to have to start telling the voters that if they want everything they are asking for, our tax system will have to be reformed. There is no way that we can get everything we want, and rely on the system that was such a good idea in 1865, when we had what seemed like unlimited trees to cut, and relied on virtually no big businesses for employment. Now, with the profits from Microsoft, Boeing and other global businesses being funneled into tax havens like Nevada and Delaware, the burden for all these needs falls on the people least able to pay for it, the public. But so many of them don’t want to hear about a progressive income tax. Without increasing new taxes, the burden for implementing McCleary for example, is going to fall on all the other state agencies, such as environmental protection, cleaning up waterways, fish and wildlife, higher ed, and the like. Is this really what you expected when you voted for these new measures? Where did you think the money would come from?

Washington state lawmakers are facing a projected budget gap of more than $2 billion for the next two-year budget ending in mid-2017, in large part due to a new voter-approved initiative to shrink class sizes, according to a state budget outlook released Wednesday. That projected shortfall does not include half of the expected financial obligation needed to increase funding for education as directed by the state Supreme Court, nor does it count the additional amount needed if collective bargaining agreements with state workers are approved. Rachel La Corte reports. (Associated Press)

http://www.thenewstribune.com/2014/11/19/3497083/washington-state-budget-outlook.html

Jefferson County Democrats Unanimously Pass Resolution On Navy Plans

On Tuesday night, the Jefferson County Democrats unanimously voted to ask elected officials at all levels to get the Forest Service to schedule public hearings (not public meetings which have less weight in deliberations), as required by law, on it’s environmental assessment of the Navy’s Pacific Northwest Electronic Warfare Range Plan and the FS’s Finding of No Significant Impacts. The EA was done without legal public input, which is required by law.

The Dems also requested that the Forest Service initiate it’s own scientific investigations and include them in an “honest and open Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) process (which is not what is happening now). At present, the person making the decision at the Forest Service indicated at the Port Angeles meeting last week that he was going to approve the EA. It seems a done deal unless we demand the legal process be followed, which at present, it is not.

If you are are concerned with the process the Navy and Forest Service is following, it is recommended you phone, not email,Senator Patty Murray, Senator Maria Cantwell and Representative Derek Kilmer in Washington and demand they push for these simple requests to be fulfilled.

Scientists Find Out What’s Killing West Coast Starfish – Earthfix

Well, the answers are finally in, and it appears a mutated strain of a common virus to starfish has set this in motion.

SEATTLE — After months of research, scientists have identified the pathogen at the heart of the starfish wasting disease that’s been killing starfish by the millions along the Pacific shores of North America, according to research published Monday.

…The research team also plans to continue investigating environmental factors such as warming water and ocean acidification that may have caused starfish to be more susceptible to the viral infection.

Read the whole story here:

http://earthfix.opb.org/flora-and-fauna/article/scientists-find-out-whats-killing-west-coast-starf/

EVENT in PA – Movie “Return of the River” at Elwha Klallam Heritage Center

Wednesday, November 19, 2014 Time 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm PST

Where: Elwha Klallam Heritage Center 401 E. First St.Port Angeles, WA
Audience: Kids, Teens, Singles, College Students, Dads, Moms, Seniors,
Cost: By donation
Contact Name: Suzie Bennett Contact Email:suzie.bennett@elwha.org
Contact Phone: 3604178545

“Return of the River” offers a story of hope and possibility amid grim environmental news. It is a film for our time: an invitation to consider crazy ideas that could transform the world for the better. It features an unlikely success story for environmental and cultural restoration. Fundamentally, the Elwha River in Washington State is a story about people and the land they inhabit. The film captures the tenacity of individuals who would not give up on a river, mirroring the tenacity of salmon headed upstream to spawn. It is a narrative with global ramifications, exploring the complex relationship between communities and the environment that sustains them. The camera soars over mountain headwaters, dives into schools of salmon,and captures turbines grinding to a halt; as the largest dam removal project in history begins. The film features people and perspectives on all sides of the Elwha debate, reflecting the many voices of the Elwha valley.

The Director will be available for a Q&A after the film.

Death by dirty water: Storm runoff a risk for fish  - Bellingham Herald

As if you needed to better understand the importance of rain gardens, stormwater runoff and salmon, after my last post, here’s the next thing in my inbox. Another recent experiment that shows the affects that stormwater has on aquatic species.

Just hours into the experiment, the prognosis was grim for salmon that had been submerged in rain runoff collected from one of Seattle’s busiest highways. One by one, the fish were removed from a tank filled with coffee-colored water and inspected: They were rigid. Their typically red gills were gray….. This was the fate of coho salmon exposed to the everyday toxic brew of dirt, metals, oil and other gunk that washes off highway pavement after rains and directly into Puget Sound. Phuong Le reports. (Associated Press)

http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2014/11/16/3977239_scientists-study-stormwater-deadly.html

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