Photos: Japanese tsunami debris still washing up on B.C. shores – Vancouver Sun

And on this fourth anniversary of the Fukushima Earthquake, the debris keeps coming. It’s hard to believe it was four years ago.  And the radioactive waste is apparently still spilling into the sea.

March 11, 2015 is the fourth anniversary of the devastating tidal waves that hit Japan after a magnitude-9.0 earthquake struck off the northeast coast of Honshu, Japan’s largest island. Debris from Japan has been washing up on North American shores since 2012. (Vancouver Sun)

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Photos+Japanese+tsunami+debris+still+washing+shores/10877860/story.html

Action Taken To Protect Fish At Bottom Of Ocean Food Chain – Earthfix

As discussed in yesterday’s post, there has been a new rule under development to protect forage fish. These fish are critical to the rest of the ocean ecosystem. The west coast fisheries managers appear to have done the right thing.

West Coast fishery managers adopted a new rule Tuesday that protects many species of forage fish at the bottom of the ocean food chain. The rule prohibits commercial fishing of herring, smelt, squid and other small fish that aren’t currently targeted by fishermen. It sets up new, more protective regulations for anyone who might want to start fishing for those species in the future. The Pacific Fishery Management Council unanimously voted to adopt the rule at a meeting in Vancouver, Washington. The council sets ocean fishing seasons off the coasts of Washington, Oregon and California. Cassandra Profita reports. (EarthFix)

http://www.opb.org/news/article/action-taken-to-protect-fish-at-bottom-of-ocean-food-chain/

West Coast fishery managers days away from landmark decision on forage fish – Oregonian

Forage fish are the basis of the much of the food source for a huge variety of species, from salmon, sea birds and many other creatures. Moving into harvesting this species could put the final nail in the coffin of the fisheries on the west coast. Seabirds are already dying in the tens of thousands now off the coast, due to lack of food. Killing off the rest of their food source seems like stupid thinking, which is in abundance these days.

West coast fishery managers are poised to make a decision next week that could alter the future of fishing in federal waters off the Pacific Coast, as well as in Oregon’s state-regulated nearshore waters. The Pacific Fishery Management Council is scheduled to vote Monday on a proposal to restrict new forage fisheries off the coast of California, Oregon and Washington unless prospective fishermen can prove harvesting a new species would not damage the ecosystem. Kelly House reports. (Oregonian)

http://www.oregonlive.com/environment/index.ssf/2015/03/west_coast_fishery_managers_da.html

NOAA study could set stage for Makah whaling to resume- Seattle Times

Just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should. A bad idea wrapped in an old tradition, that no longer makes sense. You can extrapolate a lot of things  like this that people could do, and shouldn’t. Let your imagination think about it.

There should be new ways to teach people the hunt, and the point of the hunt, without destroying these creatures that we now know are so much more than just meat for someone’s table, that is, if they even eat whale meat anymore at all. I don’t support his action on their part. I understand why some of the tribe thinks they should do it, but I hope that they don’t.

On Friday, NOAA Fisheries released a draft environmental study that could set the stage for the resumption of whaling off the Washington coast by the Makah Indian tribe. The draft proposes six options ranging from prohibiting an annual hunt for North Pacific gray whales to allowing up to 24 to be harvested within a six-year period. Hal Bernton reports. (Seattle Times)

http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/environment/noaa-study-could-set-stage-for-resumption-of-tribal-whaling/

Citizen science proves a draw for new program manager at Port Townsend Marine Science Center – PDN

We wish Susan all the best. Looks like she is a great new hire for the role.

Programs in which volunteers participate in science research attracted the Port Townsend Marine Science Center’s new program manager to the nonprofit organization. “One of the things that drew me to the marine science center is its reputation for citizen science, and I think that’s been kept secret,” said Susan Bullerdick, who started her new position last Sunday….  She worked for the Seattle Aquarium for 10 years. For seven of those years, she served as the operations manager for Centers for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE), a collaboration among the Seattle Aquarium, the Ocean Inquiry Project and the University of Washington Oceanography department and College of Education. Charlie Bermant reports. (Peninsula Daily News)

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20150304/news/303049997/citizen-science-proves-a-draw-for-new-program-manager-at-port

Federal court upholds protection for threatened marbled murrelets by rejecting timber industry lawsuit – PDN

You would think that after all these decades, that the timber industry would get to work on working with the environmental organizations rather than constantly fighting a losing battle. Collaboration gains far more than constant warfare.

A federal appeals court has rejected a lawsuit by the timber industry seeking to strip Endangered Species Act protection from a threatened seabird that nests in old-growth forests. Environmentalists said the ruling Friday by the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., should mark the end of a 15-year legal battle over logging trees used by marbled murrelets along the coasts of Oregon, Washington and northern California. Jeff Barnard reports. (Associated Press)

http://peninsuladailynews.com/article/20150304/NEWS/303049985/federal-court-upholds-protection-for-threatened-marbled-murrelets-by

Whidbey anti-jet group appeals to Navy brass – Whidbey News-Times

The battle goes on to protect us from ever increasing noise pollution.

A Central Whidbey citizen group is amping up the scope of its fight against the Navy’s increasing presence in Puget Sound. Representatives of Citizens of Ebey’s Reserve, or COER, say they mailed a letter in February to Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus addressing what they describe as the dangers of the Navy’s new EA-18G Growler. The group also threatens additional action, if necessary. Janis Reid reports. (Whidbey News-Times)

http://www.whidbeynewstimes.com/news/294911181.html

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